Neuroscience

Targeting epilepsy with surgical precision

For the more than 15 million epilepsy patients around the world whose disease is not controlled by medication, the only remaining option is removal of the parts of the brain where seizures originate. Even then, surgery is ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Synaptic dysfunction in schizophrenia

Schizophrenia, which can cause disrupted thought and mood, delusions and hallucinations, is among the most debilitating mental disorders and the most mysterious.

Neuroscience

Neuroscientists define safe protocol for EEG-fMRI imaging

A team of psychologists and neuroscientists at the Beckman Institute for Advanced Science and Technology led by assistant professor of psychology Sepideh Sadaghiani and graduate student Maximillian Egan published a study ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Characteristics of COVID-19-related encephalopathy detailed

(HealthDay)—Clinical, biological, electroencephalographic (EEG), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) patterns could identify COVID-19-related encephalopathy (CORE) among patients hospitalized with COVID-19, according to ...

Neuroscience

Getting romantic at home wearing an EEG cap

Research into the neuronal basis of emotion processing has so far mostly taken place in the laboratory, i.e. in unrealistic conditions. Bochum-based biopsychologists have now studied couples in more natural conditions. Using ...

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Electroencephalography

Electroencephalography (EEG) is the recording of electrical activity along the scalp. EEG measures voltage fluctuations resulting from ionic current flows within the neurons of the brain. In clinical contexts, EEG refers to the recording of the brain's spontaneous electrical activity over a short period of time, usually 20–40 minutes, as recorded from multiple electrodes placed on the scalp. In neurology, the main diagnostic application of EEG is in the case of epilepsy, as epileptic activity can create clear abnormalities on a standard EEG study. A secondary clinical use of EEG is in the diagnosis of coma, encephalopathies, and brain death. EEG used to be a first-line method for the diagnosis of tumors, stroke and other focal brain disorders, but this use has decreased with the advent of anatomical imaging techniques with high (<1 mm) spatial resolution like as MRI and CT. Despite limited spatial resolution, EEG continues to be a valuable tool for research and diagnosis, especially when millisecond-range temporal resolution (not possible with CT or MRI) is required.

Derivatives of the EEG technique include evoked potentials (EP), which involves averaging the EEG activity time-locked to the presentation of a stimulus of some sort (visual, somatosensory, or auditory). Event-related potentials (ERPs) refer to averaged EEG responses that are time-locked to more complex processing of stimuli; this technique is used in cognitive science, cognitive psychology, and psychophysiological research.

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