Medical research

New method visualizes groups of neurons as they compute

Using a fluorescent probe that lights up when brain cells are electrically active, MIT and Boston University researchers have shown that they can image the activity of many neurons at once, in the brains of mice.

Neuroscience

How can ultrasonic brain stimulation cure brain diseases?

Just as rays of sunlight can be focused by a magnifying glass, beams of ultrasound can be focused—not to start a fire, but to converge on a specific target. The pulses of ultrasound are able to pass through obstructions ...

Neuroscience

 A model for brain activity during brain stimulation therapy

Brain stimulation, where targeted electrical impulses are directly applied to a patient's brain, is already an effective therapy for depression, epilepsy, Parkinson's and other neurological disorders, but many more applications ...

Neuroscience

Watching music move through the brain

Scientists have observed how the human brain represents a familiar piece of music, according to research published in JNeurosci. Their results suggest that listening to and remembering music involve different cognitive processes.

Neuroscience

Why do some people stop breathing after seizures?

Could a chemical produced by the brain that regulates mood, sleep and breathing also be protective in people with epilepsy? New research has found that higher levels of serotonin in the blood after a seizure are linked to ...

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Electrical phenomena

Electrical phenomena are commonplace and unusual events that can be observed which illuminate the principles of the physics of electricity and are explained by them. Electrical phenomena are a somewhat arbitrary division of electromagnetic phenomena.

Some examples are

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