Obstetrics & gynaecology

New micro-device injects a boost to IVF success

A research team led by the University of Adelaide, in partnership with medical technology company Fertilis, has delivered a ground-breaking new micro-device to streamline the only fertility treatment procedure available for ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Nature's way is best, even when it comes to IVF

Researchers from Melbourne IVF have conducted a literature review and performed a meta-analysis to determine which cycles—with or without natural hormone production—produce higher rates of success, i.e., live birth.

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Embryo

An embryo (irregularly from Greek: ἔμβρυον, plural ἔμβρυα, lit. "that which grows," from en- "in" + bryein "to swell, be full"; the proper Latinate form would be embryum) is a multicellular diploid eukaryote in its earliest stage of development, from the time of first cell division until birth, hatching, or germination. In humans, it is called an embryo until about eight weeks after fertilization (i.e. ten weeks LMP), and from then it is instead called a fetus.

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