Medical research

Bringing magnetic resonance to fertility treatment

EPFL spin-off Annaida is developing a magnetic resonance system that can detect the chemistry inside the tiniest living organisms. The technology's initial application will be in the field of fertility treatment, where it ...

Medical research

Researchers successfully stop blood vessel, tumor growth in mice

Scientists at the National Institutes of Health and other institutions have devised a new strategy to stop tumors from developing the new blood vessels they need to grow. Once thought to be extremely promising for the treatment ...

Genetics

Genome editing at the crossroads of scandal and cure

Genetic modification of babies in China one year ago was universally condemned. At the same time, CRISPR treatments are on their way into our clinics. Jacob Corn explains the difference.

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Embryo

An embryo (irregularly from Greek: ἔμβρυον, plural ἔμβρυα, lit. "that which grows," from en- "in" + bryein "to swell, be full"; the proper Latinate form would be embryum) is a multicellular diploid eukaryote in its earliest stage of development, from the time of first cell division until birth, hatching, or germination. In humans, it is called an embryo until about eight weeks after fertilization (i.e. ten weeks LMP), and from then it is instead called a fetus.

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