Neuroscience

Brain may not need body movements to learn virtual spaces

Virtual reality is becoming increasingly present in our everyday lives, from online tours of homes for sale to high-tech headsets that immerse gamers in hyper-realistic digital worlds. While its entertainment value is well-established, ...

Genetics

Genes, the social environment, and adolescent smoking

Adolescence is a time of dramatic change. It marks a period of significant physical transformation—such as the drive toward sexual maturity. But it can also be a time of considerable psychological change and social experimentation.

Neuroscience

Social isolation derails brain development in mice

Female mice housed alone during adolescence show atypical development of the prefrontal cortex and resort to habitual behavior in adulthood, according to new research published in eNeuro. These findings show how social isolation ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Anemia may contribute to the spread of dengue fever

Mosquitoes are more likely to acquire the dengue virus when they feed on blood with low levels of iron, researchers report in the 16 September issue of Nature Microbiology. Supplementing people's diets with iron in places ...

Neuroscience

How the brain filters sounds

The sound environment is extremely dense, which is why the brain has to adapt and implement filtering mechanisms that allow it to hold its attention on the most important elements and save energy. When two identical sounds ...

Oncology & Cancer

Cancer cells 'corrupt' their healthy neighbors

The healthy cells immediately surrounding a tumour become more stem cell-like and support cancer growth, reveals a new study published in Nature.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Stable home lives improve prospects for preemies

As they grow and develop, children who were born at least 10 weeks before their due dates are at risk for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism spectrum disorder and anxiety disorders. They also have a higher ...

Genetics

How our genes and environment influence BMI and height

Environmental conditions influence our body mass index (BMI) by increasing or decreasing the effect of inherited genetic variations, University of Queensland researchers have discovered.

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