Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

North Macedonia declares measles epidemic

North Macedonia's health authorities have declared a nationwide measles epidemic in the small Balkan country after more than 960 cases were registered since the beginning of this year.

Health

State public health workforce grew from 2013 to 2017

(HealthDay)—The state health department epidemiology workforce increased 22 percent from 2013 to 2017, according to research published in the Aug. 24 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

UN health agency announces first staff Ebola infection

The World Health Organization on Sunday announced the first Ebola infection among its experts, describing the infected person as an epidemiologist who had been deployed to Sierra Leone.

Medications

Elite US Army units stop taking anti-malarial drug

The top doctor for elite U.S. Army commandos has told troops to immediately stop taking mefloquine, an anti-malaria drug found to cause permanent brain damage in rare cases.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Lessons learned from cantaloupe-listeria outbreak

(HealthDay)—Of all the dangerous bacteria lurking in foods, perhaps the most deadly is listeria, and the lesson from a 2011 outbreak is to always handle food safely, U.S. health officials say.

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Epidemiology

Epidemiology is the study of health-event, health-characteristic, or health-determinant patterns in a population. It is the cornerstone method of public health research, and helps inform policy decisions and evidence-based medicine by identifying risk factors for disease and targets for preventive medicine. Epidemiologists are involved in the design of studies, collection and statistical analysis of data, and interpretation and dissemination of results (including peer review and occasional systematic review). Major areas of epidemiological work include outbreak investigation, disease surveillance and screening (medicine), biomonitoring, and comparisons of treatment effects such as in clinical trials. Epidemiologists rely on a number of other scientific disciplines such as biology (to better understand disease processes), biostatistics (to make efficient use of the data and draw appropriate conclusions), and exposure assessment and social science disciplines (to better understand proximate and distal risk factors, and their measurement).

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