Neuroscience

What's the right amount of 'zapping' in epilepsy laser surgery?

There is an estimated 2.4 million people diagnosed with epilepsy each year, according to the World Health Organization. Some types of epileptic seizure can be essentially cured by open surgery for patients who don't respond ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Patients with both schizophrenia and epilepsy die alarmingly early

More than one in four patients with schizophrenia and epilepsy die before reaching the age of fifty. This is shown by research from Aarhus University and Aarhus University Hospital. The results, which have been published ...

Neuroscience

New drug could help treat neonatal seizures

A new drug that inhibits neonatal seizures in rodent models could open up new avenues for the treatment of epilepsy in human newborns. Researchers have identified that gluconate—a small organic compound found in fruit and ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Mind mom's mental health after child's diagnosis

Doctors should consider a "family diagnosis" when it comes to treating children with epilepsy, as recent research has uncovered the potential for long-term mental-health challenges impacting the mothers of diagnosed children.

Medical research

Trigger region found for absence epileptic seizures

Scientists have discovered a neurological origin for absence seizures—a type of seizure characterized by very short periods of lost consciousness in which people appear to stare blankly at nothing. Using a mouse model of ...

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Epilepsy

Epilepsy (from the Greek επιληψία /epili΄psia/ ) is a common chronic neurological disorder characterized by recurrent unprovoked seizures. These seizures are transient signs and/or symptoms of abnormal, excessive or synchronous neuronal activity in the brain. About 50 million people worldwide have epilepsy, with almost 90% of these people being in developing countries. Epilepsy is more likely to occur in young children, or people over the age of 65 years, however it can occur at any time. Epilepsy is usually controlled, but not cured, with medication, although surgery may be considered in difficult cases. However, over 30% of people with epilepsy do not have seizure control even with the best available medications. Not all epilepsy syndromes are lifelong – some forms are confined to particular stages of childhood. Epilepsy should not be understood as a single disorder, but rather as a group of syndromes with vastly divergent symptoms but all involving episodic abnormal electrical activity in the brain.

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