Diabetes

Hormone therapy linked to decrease level of diabetes biomarkers

The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) remains one of the most highly quoted when debating the benefits and risks of hormone therapy. Now a new study based on WHI data demonstrates that, among other benefits, hormone therapy ...

Cardiology

Rethinking how cholesterol is integrated into cells

Most people have heard of "cholesterol levels" and the dangers of high blood cholesterol, which is one of the main causes of cardiovascular disease. But besides the harmful side effects of high cholesterol, cholesterol is ...

Overweight & Obesity

The role of a single molecule in obesity

A single cholesterol-derived molecule, called 27-hydroxycholesterol (27HC), lurks inside your bloodstream and will increase your body fat, even if you don't eat a diet filled with red meat and fried food. That kind of diet, ...

Parkinson's & Movement disorders

Estrogen improves Parkinson's disease symptoms

Brain-selective estrogen treatment improves the symptoms of Parkinson's disease in male mice, according to new research published in JNeurosci. These findings may help explain the sex differences in Parkinson's disease and ...

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Estrogen

Estrogens (U.S., otherwise oestrogens or œstrogens) are a group of steroid compounds, named for their importance in the estrous cycle, and functioning as the primary female sex hormone, their name comes from estrus (period of fertility for female mammals) + gen = to generate.

Estrogens are used as part of some oral contraceptives, in estrogen replacement therapy for postmenopausal women, and in hormone replacement therapy for transwomen.

Like all steroid hormones, estrogens readily diffuse across the cell membrane. Once inside the cell, they bind to and activate estrogen receptors which in turn up-regulate the expression of many genes. Additionally, estrogens have been shown to activate a G protein-coupled receptor, GPR30.

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