Medical research

Researchers explain muscle loss with menopause

In an article recently published in Cell Reports, lead authors Dawn Lowe, Ph.D., Professor in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, Division of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science Graduate Program, University ...

Oncology & Cancer

Determining risk of recurrence in triple-negative breast cancer

A personalized prognosis for patients diagnosed with triple-negative breast cancer was the goal of a new study by Katherine Varley, Ph.D., researcher at Huntsman Cancer Institute (HCI) and assistant professor of oncological ...

Oncology & Cancer

Estrogen receptors might hold key in obesity prevention

Despite countless fad diets, both obesity and metabolic diseases continue to plague communities across the U.S. Now, researchers from the University of Missouri believe that the clue to treatment might be related to estrogen—for ...

Immunology

Asthma answer may not be steroids for women

For women depending on steroids to treat severe asthma, their body's estrogen may not only be preventing the treatment from working effectively, but making the asthma worse, according to a recent Western study.

Oncology & Cancer

Estrogen byproducts linked to survival in breast cancer patients

Researchers from the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center found preliminary evidence that measuring byproducts of the hormone estrogen can help them predict survival for women with breast cancer.

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Estrogen

Estrogens (U.S., otherwise oestrogens or œstrogens) are a group of steroid compounds, named for their importance in the estrous cycle, and functioning as the primary female sex hormone, their name comes from estrus (period of fertility for female mammals) + gen = to generate.

Estrogens are used as part of some oral contraceptives, in estrogen replacement therapy for postmenopausal women, and in hormone replacement therapy for transwomen.

Like all steroid hormones, estrogens readily diffuse across the cell membrane. Once inside the cell, they bind to and activate estrogen receptors which in turn up-regulate the expression of many genes. Additionally, estrogens have been shown to activate a G protein-coupled receptor, GPR30.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA