Oncology & Cancer

Breakthrough study of hormone 'cross-talk' in breast cancer

Scientists led by EPFL have successfully engrafted breast cancer cells on mice, allowing them to study in vivo the cross-talk between the estrogen and progesterone receptors that hampers hormone therapies. Their findings ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Women burn fat even after menopause

The estrogen deficiency following menopause is thought to impair women's ability to use fat as an energy source. A study published in Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases and conducted at the Faculty of Sport ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Estrogen treatment associated with reduced COVID deaths

A new paper in Family Practice, published by Oxford University Press, indicates that receiving hormone replacement therapy within six months of a recorded diagnosis of COVID-19 was associated with a reduction in mortality ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Stress may be associated with fertility issues in women

Female rats exposed to a scream sound may have diminished ovarian reserve and reduced fertility, according to a small animal study published in the Endocrine Society's journal, Endocrinology.

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Discovering a mysterious estrogen's important role in pregnancy

When a woman becomes pregnant, her levels of estriol, one of the three common estrogens that are nearly undetectable before conception, skyrocket. However, scientists never knew what this hormone does or why levels of it ...

page 1 from 40

Estrogen

Estrogens (U.S., otherwise oestrogens or œstrogens) are a group of steroid compounds, named for their importance in the estrous cycle, and functioning as the primary female sex hormone, their name comes from estrus (period of fertility for female mammals) + gen = to generate.

Estrogens are used as part of some oral contraceptives, in estrogen replacement therapy for postmenopausal women, and in hormone replacement therapy for transwomen.

Like all steroid hormones, estrogens readily diffuse across the cell membrane. Once inside the cell, they bind to and activate estrogen receptors which in turn up-regulate the expression of many genes. Additionally, estrogens have been shown to activate a G protein-coupled receptor, GPR30.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA