Biomedical technology

Wearable pressure-sensitive devices for medical use

In recent years, the use of wearable sensing devices has become a part of people's everyday lives. Devices such as smart watches, for example, can be used to monitor physical fitness functions such as heart rate, sleep and ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Virus tests support masks against COVID-19

Testing of commonly available fabric masks has found they significantly reduce the number of aerosolised viruses a wearer could be exposed to.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Expert's guidance on non-medical, reusable fabric masks

The University of Otago's leading expert on fiber and textile sciences has produced guidance on factors to consider when choosing or creating a non-medical, reusable fabric mask.

Medical research

Making a homemade COVID mask? Study explains best fabric choices

Health authorities believe COVID-19 spreads by the transmission of respiratory droplets, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends homemade cloth face coverings for use in public spaces. Starting today, ...

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Textile

A textile or cloth is a flexible woven material consisting of a network of natural or artificial fibres often referred to as thread or yarn. Yarn is produced by spinning raw fibres of wool, flax, cotton, or other material to produce long strands. Textiles are formed by weaving, knitting, crocheting, knotting, or pressing fibres together (felt).

The words fabric and cloth are used in textile assembly trades (such as tailoring and dressmaking) as synonyms for textile. However, there are subtle differences in these terms in specialized usage. Textile refers to any material made of interlacing fibres. Fabric refers to any material made through weaving, knitting, spreading, crocheting, or bonding that may be used in production of further goods (garments, etc.). Cloth may be used synonymously with fabric but often refers to a finished piece of fabric used for a specific purpose (e.g., table cloth).

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