Neuroscience

Men and women aren't equal when it comes to concussion

Women athletes are twice as likely as men to get concussed—and the effects are more severe. But with research focusing mainly on men, what can we do to make sure women with concussion aren't left behind?

Sports medicine & Kinesiology

Rise in testosterone level boosts young women's running capacity

A rise in the level of the male hormone testosterone significantly boosts young physically active women's capacity to run for longer, reveals the first study of its kind, published online in the British Journal of Sports ...

Sports medicine & Kinesiology

Female athletes seek specialty care for concussion later than males

Female athletes seek specialty medical treatment later than male athletes for sports-related concussions (SRC), and this delay may cause them to experience more symptoms and longer recoveries. Researchers from the Sports ...

Pediatrics

Concussion risk is higher in female athletes

With schools starting back for the year, many young athletes are returning to sports—and with that comes the possibility of injuries, including concussions.

Neuroscience

What makes athletes report or hide concussion symptoms?

Whether or not an NCAA Division I athlete is likely to report concussion symptoms depends on factors including their vested interests, their understanding of health implications, and their team culture and societal influences ...

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