Neuroscience

Exploring the science of inspiration

Have you ever struggled with a problem that appeared to have no solution, and after turning your attention elsewhere, suddenly received a spark of inspiration?

Psychology & Psychiatry

How brains of doers differ from those of procrastinators

Researchers at Ruhr-Universität Bochum have analysed why certain people tend to put tasks off rather than tackling them directly. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), they identified two brain areas whose volume and functional ...

Neuroscience

Broken brains and network structures

Sometimes a disease is the handiwork of a clear culprit: the invasion of a bacterium, or the mutation of a gene. Conventionally, scientists have assumed the same for neurological disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, and ...

Neuroscience

Dynamics of brain volume loss vary with MS progression

(HealthDay)—Brain volume loss (BVL) has nonlinear dynamics and limited reproducibility as a marker of therapeutic response in multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study published online July 2 in JAMA Neurology.

Neuroscience

Virtual brain could aid surgical planning

Researchers have simulated neural activity based on the unique structural architecture of individual brain tumor patients using a platform called The Virtual Brain. The findings, reported in eNeuro, are a first step toward ...

Neuroscience

MRI technique detects spinal cord changes in MS patients

A Vanderbilt University Medical Center-led research team has shown that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can detect changes in resting-state spinal cord function in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS).

Neuroscience

Why the world looks stable while we move

Head movements change the environmental image received by the eyes. People still perceive the world as stable, because the brain corrects for any changes in visual information caused by head movements. For the first time, ...

page 1 from 23

Functional magnetic resonance imaging

Functional MRI or functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI) is a type of specialized MRI scan. It measures the haemodynamic response related to neural activity in the brain or spinal cord of humans or other animals. It is one of the most recently developed forms of neuroimaging. Since the early 1990s, fMRI has come to dominate the brain mapping field due to its low invasiveness, lack of radiation exposure, and relatively wide availability.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA