Medications

Nintedanib found effective for gastrointestinal stromal tumors

A research team led by Prof. Liu Qingsong and Liu Jing from the Hefei Institutes of Physical Science (HFIPS) of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) has recently found that nintedanib, a multikinase inhibitor of the receptor ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

IgA antibodies seem to protect unvaccinated against COVID-19

Despite daily contact with COVID-19 patients early in the pandemic, some health professionals avoided falling ill. As a University of Gothenburg study shows, the explanation appears to be an antidote in the immune system: ...

Other

Health risk due to micro- and nanoplastics in food

Five grams of plastic particles on average enter the human gastrointestinal tract per person per week. This is roughly equivalent to the weight of a credit card. Whether ingested micro- and nanoplastics pose a health risk ...

Gastroenterology

A simple diagnostic tool for gastrointestinal disorders

As food moves through the digestive tract, contracting muscles along the tract keep things flowing smoothly. Loss of this motility can lead to acid reflux, failure of food to move out of the stomach, or constipation.

Parkinson's & Movement disorders

The gut-brain axis in Parkinson's disease

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a progressive and complex disorder that affects multiple parts of the brain but also other organ systems. Symptoms start gradually, sometimes with a barely noticeable tremor in just one hand. Tremor ...

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Gastrointestinal tract

The digestive tract is the system of organs within multicellular animals that takes in food, digests it to extract energy and nutrients, and expels the remaining matter. The major function of the gastrointestinal tract are ingestion, digestion, absorption, and defecation. The GI tract differs substantially from animal to animal. Some animals have multi-chambered stomachs, while some animals' stomachs contain a single box. In a human adult male, the GI tract is approximately 6.5 meters (20 feet) long and consists of the upper and lower GI tracts. The tract may also be divided into foregut, midgut, and hindgut, reflecting the embryological origin of each segment of the tract.

The remainder of this article focuses on human gastrointestinal anatomy; see digestion for the process in other organisms.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA