Genetics

Researchers map previously unknown disease in children

Two children from Europe and one from Canada, aged four, six and 10, suffer from a previously unknown disease that causes epileptic seizures, loss of magnesium and reduced intelligence. There is currently no way to treat ...

Cardiology

Gut protein mutations shield against spikes in glucose

Why is it that, despite consuming the same number of calories, sodium and sugar, some people face little risk of diabetes or obesity while others are at higher risk? A new study by investigators at Brigham and Women's Hospital ...

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Genetic analysis

Genetic analysis can be used generally to describe methods both used in and resulting from the sciences of genetics and molecular biology, or to applications resulting from this research.

Genetic analysis may be done to identify genetic/inherited disorders and also to make a differential diagnosis in certain somatic diseases such as cancer. Genetic analyses of cancer include detection of mutations, fusion genes, and DNA copy number changes.

Genetic analyses include molecular technologies such as PCR, RT-PCR, DNA sequencing, and DNA microarrays, and cytogenetic methods such as karyotyping and fluoresence in situ hybridisation.

Please note: This field is fast-changing, definitions are in flux, there is historical and contemporary overlap of the following categories, and phrases like "the results of genetic analysis" can indicate any or all of the following, depending on the facts of the matter being described.

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