Health

Study finds link between hypertension and air pollution

A new study soon to appear in the Journal of Public Health suggests that air pollution and living in apartment buildings may be associated with an increased risk for dangerous conditions like heart disease, stroke, and type ...

Cardiology

Study reveals new genetic link to heart disease

A collaboration involving the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, the German Heart Center Munich, AstraZeneca, and Karolinska Institutet in Sweden has demonstrated that more than 30 percent of heart disease risk stems ...

Genetics

Fetal genome involved in triggering premature birth

Mutations in the gene that codes for SLIT2, a protein expressed in fetal cells in placentas and involved in directing the growth of the fetal nervous system, may contribute to premature births, possibly by activating the ...

Neuroscience

High LDL linked to early-onset Alzheimer's

Researchers with the Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Emory University have found a link between high LDL cholesterol levels and early-onset Alzheimer's disease. The results could help doctors understand how the ...

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Genetic research into dyslexia

and related disorders Education · Neuropsychology

Alexia (acquired dyslexia) Developmental dyslexia Dyslexia research Dyslexia support by country Management of dyslexia

Auditory processing disorder Dyscalculia · Dysgraphia Dysphasia · Dyspraxia Scotopic sensitivity syndrome

Reading acquisition Spelling · Literacy · Irlen filters Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic

Languages by Writing System Dyslexia support People with dyslexia Dyslexia in fiction

The genetic research into dyslexia has its roots in the work of Galaburda and Kemper, 1979, and Galaburda et al. 1985, from the examination of post-autopsy brains of people with dyslexia. When they observed anatomical differences in the language center in a dyslexic brain, they showed microscopic cortical malformations known as extopias and more rarely vascular micro-malformations, and in some instances these cortical malformations appeared as a microgyrus. These studies and those of Cohen et al. 1989 suggested abnormal cortical development which was presumed to occur before or during the sixth month of foetal brain development.

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