Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Raising awareness of spina bifida

Spina bifida is the most common birth defect of the central nervous system and the second most common of all structural birth defects. To learn more about it, Baylor College of Medicine's From the Labs sat with Dr. Richard ...

Genetics

Scientists identify genetic risk factors for opioid use disorder

A new human genomics study led by Yale scientists has identified genetic risk factors for opioid use disorder (OUD) and related substance use disorders according to a new large-scale genome-wide association study—increasing ...

Oncology & Cancer

9 common questions about genetic testing for cancer

Your genes play a role in nearly all areas of your health. A gene is like an instruction manual for your body that tells your body how to function, develop and stay healthy. People have about 20,000 genes in their bodies.

Genetics

Gene variant links trigger finger and carpal tunnel syndrome

A new NDORMS study, published in The Lancet Rheumatology, has found a genetic variant that increases the risk of both carpal tunnel syndrome and trigger finger, and opens the door for new therapies that involve blocking the ...

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Genetic research into dyslexia

and related disorders Education · Neuropsychology

Alexia (acquired dyslexia) Developmental dyslexia Dyslexia research Dyslexia support by country Management of dyslexia

Auditory processing disorder Dyscalculia · Dysgraphia Dysphasia · Dyspraxia Scotopic sensitivity syndrome

Reading acquisition Spelling · Literacy · Irlen filters Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic

Languages by Writing System Dyslexia support People with dyslexia Dyslexia in fiction

The genetic research into dyslexia has its roots in the work of Galaburda and Kemper, 1979, and Galaburda et al. 1985, from the examination of post-autopsy brains of people with dyslexia. When they observed anatomical differences in the language center in a dyslexic brain, they showed microscopic cortical malformations known as extopias and more rarely vascular micro-malformations, and in some instances these cortical malformations appeared as a microgyrus. These studies and those of Cohen et al. 1989 suggested abnormal cortical development which was presumed to occur before or during the sixth month of foetal brain development.

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