Genetics

Multigene test predicts depression risk

An international team led by Munich-based researchers has found a genetic score that reliably predicts which youths will have depression, the severity of the depression and the age of onset. Furthermore, an additive effect ...

Genetics

Researchers identify 'beauty spots' in the genome

Genes play a role in determining the beauty of a person's face, but that role varies with the person's sex, according to a new study by Qiongshi Lu and colleagues at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, published 4th April ...

Medical research

Creating blood vessels on demand

When organs or tissues are damaged, new blood vessels must form as they play a vital role in bringing nutrients and eliminating waste and it is necessary for organs and tissues to regain their normal function. At present, ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Study debunks 'depression genes' hypotheses

Over the past quarter-century, researchers have published hundreds of studies suggesting a small set of particular genes or gene-variants plays a substantial role in boosting susceptibility to depression. Such papers fueled ...

Genetics

Website puts fears about depression genes into perspective

A new interactive website launched by UNSW mental health researchers allows people with a family history of major depressive or bipolar disorder to work out how likely it is that they – or any of their offspring – could ...

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Genetic research into dyslexia

and related disorders Education · Neuropsychology

Alexia (acquired dyslexia) Developmental dyslexia Dyslexia research Dyslexia support by country Management of dyslexia

Auditory processing disorder Dyscalculia · Dysgraphia Dysphasia · Dyspraxia Scotopic sensitivity syndrome

Reading acquisition Spelling · Literacy · Irlen filters Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic

Languages by Writing System Dyslexia support People with dyslexia Dyslexia in fiction

The genetic research into dyslexia has its roots in the work of Galaburda and Kemper, 1979, and Galaburda et al. 1985, from the examination of post-autopsy brains of people with dyslexia. When they observed anatomical differences in the language center in a dyslexic brain, they showed microscopic cortical malformations known as extopias and more rarely vascular micro-malformations, and in some instances these cortical malformations appeared as a microgyrus. These studies and those of Cohen et al. 1989 suggested abnormal cortical development which was presumed to occur before or during the sixth month of foetal brain development.

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