Health

Q and A: 10 nutrition myths debunked

DEAR MAYO CLINIC: As a woman in my 40s, I've experienced a wide variety of diet fads come and go. One week I read it's bad to eat carbs. The next week, it's full-fat dairy products. I've seen articles that say I should only ...

Health

Research says fad diets don't work: Why are they so popular?

Two years into a pandemic that landed people in their living rooms, generating countless hours of television binging and stress eating, the nation has a new problem to worry about: Nearly half of U.S. adults, many already ...

Gastroenterology

For IBS, specific diets are less important than expected

Many IBS sufferers avoid certain types of food and often exclude gluten. However, a large new study from Chalmers University of Technology and Uppsala University, Sweden, does not show a relationship between high intake of ...

Gastroenterology

Consumer health: Summer eating with celiac disease

With summer nearly here, thoughts turn to summer eating, including potlucks, picnics at the beach and celebrations. In addition to concerns about food safety and keeping sand out of the fruit salad, people with celiac disease ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

5 facts about celiac disease

For people with celiac disease, foods as seemingly wholesome as whole grain bread can be dangerous.

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Gluten

Gluten (from Latin gluten, "glue") is a protein composite found in foods processed from wheat and related grain species, including barley and rye. It gives elasticity to dough, helping it to rise and to keep its shape, and often giving the final product a chewy texture.

Gluten is the composite of a gliadin and a glutelin, which is conjoined with starch in the endosperm of various grass-related grains. The prolamin and glutelin from wheat (gliadin, which is alcohol-soluble, and glutenin, which is only soluble in dilute acids or alkalis) compose about 80% of the protein contained in wheat seed. Being insoluble in water, they can be purified by washing away the associated starch. Worldwide, gluten is a source of protein, both in foods prepared directly from sources containing it, and as an additive to foods otherwise low in protein.

The seeds of most flowering plants have endosperms with stored protein to nourish embryonic plants during germination. True gluten, with gliadin and glutenin, is limited to certain members of the grass family. The stored proteins of maize and rice are sometimes called glutens, but their proteins differ from gluten.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA