Medical research

Research shows that drinking Matcha tea can reduce anxiety

Many different countries have a tea culture, and Japanese Matcha tea is growing in popularity around the world. In Japan, Matcha has a long history of being used for various medicinal purposes. It has been suspected to have ...

Health

Four superfoods to put on your menu today

(HealthDay)—Science continues to discover healthy substances in foods beyond vitamins and minerals. Though no one food provides everything you need, here are four trending superfoods—all high in antioxidants—that belong ...

Health

Tap or bottled? Water composition impacts health benefits of tea

Here's to sipping a cupful of health: Green tea steeped in bottled water has a more bitter taste, but it has more antioxidants than tea brewed using tap water, according to new Cornell University food science research published ...

Oncology & Cancer

Matcha green tea kills cancer stem cells in tests

Matcha, the green tea packed with antioxidants, is often hailed as containing properties which prevent disease. Scientists in Salford, UK have shed a ray of light on the claim by testing it on cancer stem cells – with surprising ...

Cardiology

Can a daily cup of tea do a heart good?

The latest study on the coffee alternative suggests at least a cup a day may help your body cling to heart-helping "good cholesterol" as you age.

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Green tea

Green tea is a type of tea made solely with the leaves of Camellia sinensis that has undergone minimal oxidation during processing. Green tea originates from China and has become associated with many cultures in Asia from Japan to the Middle East. Recently, it has become more widespread in the West, where black tea is traditionally consumed. Many varieties of green tea have been created in countries where it is grown. These varieties can differ substantially due to variable growing conditions, processing and harvesting time.

Over the last few decades green tea has been subjected to many scientific and medical studies to determine the extent of its long-purported health benefits, with some evidence suggesting regular green tea drinkers may have lower chances of heart disease and developing certain types of cancer. Green tea has also been claimed as useful for "weight loss management"[citation needed] - a claim with no scientific support according to medical databases such as PubMed.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA