Oncology & Cancer

Gut microbes differ in men with prostate cancer

Researchers have found a significant difference in the gut microbiota of men with prostate cancer, compared with those who have benign biopsies. The study is presented at the European Association of Urology annual congress ...

Medical research

Gut bacteria mine dietary fiber to release beneficial nutrients

A new study from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis demonstrates that certain human gut microbes can mine dietary fiber to extract nutrients that otherwise would remain inaccessible to the human body. The ...

Medical research

Common prebiotic fiber mitigates harm of high-salt diet in rats

New research in rats finds a diet high in the prebiotic fiber inulin offered a protective effect against the damage of a high-salt diet. The research will be presented this week at the American Physiological Society (APS) ...

Immunology

'Bad guy' blood cells vital to gut health found

A Monash University collaboration has found that eosinophils, a type of white blood cell commonly associated with asthma and allergy, play an important role in maintaining a healthy gut.

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Gastrointestinal tract

The digestive tract is the system of organs within multicellular animals that takes in food, digests it to extract energy and nutrients, and expels the remaining matter. The major function of the gastrointestinal tract are ingestion, digestion, absorption, and defecation. The GI tract differs substantially from animal to animal. Some animals have multi-chambered stomachs, while some animals' stomachs contain a single box. In a human adult male, the GI tract is approximately 6.5 meters (20 feet) long and consists of the upper and lower GI tracts. The tract may also be divided into foregut, midgut, and hindgut, reflecting the embryological origin of each segment of the tract.

The remainder of this article focuses on human gastrointestinal anatomy; see digestion for the process in other organisms.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA