Psychology & Psychiatry

Word order predicts a native speakers' working memory

Several studies have investigated how humans store and retrieve memories under different conditions. Typically, stimuli presented at the beginning and at the end of a list are recalled better than stimuli from the middle. ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Mental health disorders common following mild head injury

A new study reveals that approximately 1 in 5 individuals may experience mental health symptoms up to six months after mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), suggesting the importance of follow-up care for these patients. Scientists ...

Neuroscience

Concussion and its consequences

Professor Inga Koerte uses advanced medical imaging to study the immediate and long-term effects of repetitive head trauma on the brains of football players. In the following interview, she discusses her findings and their ...

Genetics

Scientists find genes with large effects on head and brain size

Children's heads expand steadily to accommodate their growing brains, and doctors routinely measure head circumference during the first years of life to assess healthy brain development. Children from around the world follow ...

Neuroscience

Cracking the code on 'cavernous malformations'

Although most have never heard the term "cavernous malformation," as many as 1 in 500 people may have this condition, which can cause bleeding, seizures, muscle weakness, and motor and memory problems.

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Head

In anatomy, the head of an animal is the rostral part (from anatomical position) that usually comprises the brain, eyes, ears, nose and mouth (all of which aid in various sensory functions, such as sight, hearing, smell, and taste). Some very simple animals may not have a head, but many bilaterally symmetric forms do.

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