Medical research

Stem cell study suggests paths to restore hearing

It turns out that to hear a person yapping, you need a protein called Yap. Working as part of what is known as the Yap/Tead complex, this important protein sends signals to the hearing organ to attain the correct size during ...

Neuroscience

Essential key to hearing sensitivity discovered

New research from the University of Virginia School of Medicine is shedding light on the biological architecture that lets us hear—and on a genetic disorder that causes both deafness and blindness.

Gerontology & Geriatrics

Hearing loss linked to postural instability in older adults

(HealthDay)—The odds of postural instability are increased in older adults with moderate or worse hearing loss, even when hearing loss is present on only one side, according to a study published online April 23 in JAMA ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Ménière's disease: New clinical practice guideline

The American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery Foundation published the Clinical Practice Guideline: Ménière's Disease today in Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery. Ménière's disease is a disorder of the ...

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Hearing impairment

A hearing impairment or deafness is a full or partial decrease in the ability to detect or understand sounds. Caused by a wide range of biological and environmental factors, loss of hearing can happen to any organism that perceives sound. "Hearing impaired" is often used to refer to those who are deaf, although the term is viewed negatively by members of Deaf culture, who prefer the terms "Deaf" and "Hard of Hearing".

Sound waves vary in amplitude and in frequency. Amplitude is the sound wave's peak pressure variation. Frequency is the number of cycles per second of a sinusoidal component of a sound wave. Loss of the ability to detect some frequencies, or to detect low-amplitude sounds that an organism naturally detects, is a hearing impairment.

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