Cardiology

Act now to meet global heart disease targets

Cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of mortality in Europe, and World Health Organization (WHO) heart disease goals will not be achieved by 2025 unless urgent action is taken. That is the finding of a European ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Pioneering remote screening for vital health signs indicating COVID-19

A key symptom of COVID-19—oxygen saturation—is now being estimated remotely from a camera, thanks to research from University of South Australia engineers Professor Javaan Chahl, Dr. Ali Al-Naji and their team of graduate ...

Cardiology

Mother brought back to life the day she gave birth

Jessica Grib noticed being a lot more tired with her second pregnancy. She felt winded easily and couldn't catch her breath when lying down. Near her delivery date, she started having issues with high blood pressure. At 36 ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Virtual reality helps measure vulnerability to stress

We all react to stress in different ways. A sudden loud noise or flash of light can elicit different degrees of response from people, which indicates that some of us are more susceptible to the impact of stress than others.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Pacific's Samoa records first case of coronavirus

Samoa announced its first case of COVID-19 on Thursday, as the coronavirus pandemic continued to spread to previously untouched Pacific island nations.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Be mindful: Study shows mindfulness might not work as you expect

If dispositional mindfulness can teach us anything about how we react to stress, it might be an unexpected lesson on its ineffectiveness at managing stress as it's happening, according to new research from the University ...

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Heart rate

The pulse rates can also be measured at any point on the body where an artery's pulsation is transmitted to the surface - often as it is compressed against an underlying structure like bone - by pressuring it with the index and middle finger. The thumb should not be used for measuring another person's heart rate, as its strong pulse may interfere with discriminating the site of pulsation Some commonly palpated sites include:

A more precise method of determining pulse involves the use of an electrocardiograph, or ECG (also abbreviated EKG). Continuous electrocardiograph monitoring of the heart is routinely done in many clinical settings, especially in critical care medicine. Commercial heart rate monitors are also available, consisting of a chest strap with electrodes. The signal is transmitted to a wrist receiver for display. Heart rate monitors allow accurate measurements to be taken continuously and can be used during exercise when manual measurement would be difficult or impossible (such as when the hands are being used).

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA