Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Researchers show how Ebola virus hijacks host lipids

Robert Stahelin studies some of the world's deadliest viruses. Filoviruses, including Ebola virus and Marburg virus, cause viral hemorrhagic fever with high fatality rates. Stahelin, professor at Purdue University, examines ...

Cardiology

Portable MRIs bring diagnostics to stroke patients' bedside

A portable, low-field Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) system may become a safe and practical way to get accurate brain images at a patient's bedside, according to preliminary research to be presented at the American Stroke ...

Neuroscience

Supratentorial ICH outcomes better in young blacks, hispanics

(HealthDay)—For young adults with supratentorial intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), functional outcomes are improved with black and Hispanic versus white race/ethnicity, according to a study published online Jan. 22 in Neurology.

Pediatrics

High-dose erythropoietin no benefit for extreme preemies

(HealthDay)—For extremely preterm infants, high-dose erythropoietin treatment from 24 hours after birth does not result in a reduced risk for severe neurodevelopmental impairment or death at age 2 years, according to a ...

page 1 from 39

Bleeding

Bleeding, technically known as hemorrhaging or haemorrhaging (see American and British spelling differences) is the loss of blood or blood escape from the circulatory system. Bleeding can occur internally, where blood leaks from blood vessels inside the body or externally, either through a natural opening such as the vagina, mouth, nose, ear or anus, or through a break in the skin. Desanguination is a massive blood loss, and the complete loss of blood is referred to as exsanguination. Typically, a healthy person can endure a loss of 10–15% of the total blood volume without serious medical difficulties, and blood donation typically takes 8–10% of the donor's blood volume.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA