Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Ebola expert weighs in on news of a potential cure

Scientists recently reported that two treatments saved the lives of people infected with the Ebola virus—with the New York Times reporting that roughly 90% of newly infected patients were saved—suggesting we are ever ...

Cardiology

Leisure-time physical activity linked to lower SAH risk

(HealthDay)—Leisure-time physical activity (LTPA) is associated with reduced risk of aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH), according to a study published online June 25 in Scientific Reports.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Uganda confirms first Ebola case outside outbreak in Congo

A child in Uganda has tested positive for Ebola in the first cross-border case of the deadly virus since an outbreak started in neighboring Congo last year, Uganda's health ministry said late Tuesday, in a blow to efforts ...

Cardiology

Antiplatelets do not up recurrence in intracerebral hemorrhage

(HealthDay)—For patients with intracerebral hemorrhage, those who start antiplatelet therapy do not have an increased risk for recurrence, including those with cerebral microbleeds, according to two studies published online ...

Neuroscience

Lowering blood pressure reduces brain bleeding in strokes

The search for treatments for spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage, the most devastating type of stroke, which carries a 40% mortality rate, has been rife with disappointments. But a new study suggests that intensive blood ...

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Bleeding

Bleeding, technically known as hemorrhaging or haemorrhaging (see American and British spelling differences) is the loss of blood or blood escape from the circulatory system. Bleeding can occur internally, where blood leaks from blood vessels inside the body or externally, either through a natural opening such as the vagina, mouth, nose, ear or anus, or through a break in the skin. Desanguination is a massive blood loss, and the complete loss of blood is referred to as exsanguination. Typically, a healthy person can endure a loss of 10–15% of the total blood volume without serious medical difficulties, and blood donation typically takes 8–10% of the donor's blood volume.

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