Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

CDC: Proportion of increased-risk deceased organ donors on rise

(HealthDay)—Among deceased organ donors, there has been an increase in the proportion at increased risk for transmitting hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), and HIV to recipients, according to research published ...

Cancer

Many hepatitis infections go undiagnosed in cancer patients

Results from the largest study of hepatitis B and C and HIV infection prevalence in cancer patients show an alarmingly high rate of undiagnosed acute and chronic hepatitis B and C. Hepatitis B and C are serious but treatable ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Screening for Hepatitis C can reduce chance of liver disease

Hepatitis C is a good news, bad news kind of disease. The bad news is that many with the liver-attacking virus may not even know it. The good news is that once discovered, doctors can effectively treat and even remove it.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Hepatitis: Liver failure attributable to compromised blood supply

In severe cases, a viral hepatitis infection can result in liver failure. A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered that immune cells attack cells in the vascular system, which disrupts the liver's ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Reducing unnecessary medication for hepatitis B patients

Not all chronic hepatitis B (HBV) patients require lifelong treatment; but the risks of blindly withdrawing treatment can be severe. However, there's little consensus on which patients can be safely discontinued from treatment, ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

2017 hepatitis A outbreaks tied to drug use, homelessness

(HealthDay)—Investigations of hepatitis A outbreaks in four states in 2017 suggested a shift toward increasing person-to-person transmission of hepatitis A, according to research published in the Nov. 2 issue of the U.S. ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

High stability of the hepatitis B virus

At room temperature, hepatitis B virus (HBV) remains contagious for several weeks and can even withstand temperatures of four degrees centigrade over the span of nine months. When applied properly, disinfectants are effective ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

NFID initiative working to up hepatitis B vaccination rates

(HealthDay)—A new initiative to increase hepatitis B virus vaccination rates among at-risk adults has been developed, according to a report from the National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) published in support ...

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Hepatitis B

Hepatitis B is a disease caused by HBV hepatitis B virus which infects the liver of hominoidae, including humans, and causes an inflammation called hepatitis. Originally known as "serum hepatitis", the disease has caused epidemics in parts of Asia and Africa, and it is endemic in China. About a third of the world's population, more than 2 billion people, have been infected with the hepatitis B virus. This includes 350 million chronic carriers of the virus. Transmission of hepatitis B virus results from exposure to infectious blood or body fluids containing blood.

The acute illness causes liver inflammation, vomiting, jaundice and—rarely—death. Chronic hepatitis B may eventually cause liver cirrhosis and liver cancer—a fatal disease with very poor response to current chemotherapy. The infection is preventable by vaccination.

Hepatitis B virus is an hepadnavirus—hepa from hepatotrophic and dna because it is a DNA virus—and it has a circular genome composed of partially double-stranded DNA. The viruses replicate through an RNA intermediate form by reverse transcription, and in this respect they are similar to retroviruses. Although replication takes place in the liver, the virus spreads to the blood where virus-specific proteins and their corresponding antibodies are found in infected people. Blood tests for these proteins and antibodies are used to diagnose the infection.

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