Diabetes

Recent plateauing seen in prevalence of diagnosed diabetes

(HealthDay)—The prevalence of diagnosed diabetes has plateaued during the last eight years, while the incidence has declined, according to a study published online May 28 in BMJ Open Diabetes Research & Care.

Diabetes

Race, ethnicity influence fracture risk in people with diabetes

Caucasians and Hispanics with diabetes have a greater risk of fracture compared to those without diabetes, while African Americans with diabetes have little to no additional fracture risk, according to a study to be presented ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Dementia looks different in brains of Hispanics

A major new study from the UC Davis Alzheimer's Center has uncovered dramatic differences in the brains of Hispanics with a dementia diagnosis compared with those of non-Hispanic whites and of African Americans.

page 1 from 23

Hispanic

Hispanic (Spanish: hispano, hispánico) is a term that originally denoted a relationship to Hispania, which is to say the Iberian Peninsula: Portugal, Andorra, Gibraltar and Spain. During the Modern Era, Hispanic sometimes takes on a more limited meaning, particularly in the United States, where the term can mean a person of (usually) mixed race with a Spanish surname. As such, the term to many people in North America has lost its association with Spain and Portugal, and has become associated primarily with Latin America. This usage is viewed by some as incomplete since the term Hispanic has referred to Hispania (Iberian Pennisula: Modern Day Spain and Portugal) and its Hispanic inhabitants (The Spanish and Portuguese) for thousands of years. Currently many federal and/or state agencies have made this distinction, and presently include peoples of Spain (Spanish) and peoples of Portugal (Portuguese) in classifying Hispanics. However, while some individuals from Spain and Portugal classify themselves as Hispanic, others emphatically do not.

The term has also been used to denote the culture and people of Spanish and Portuguese colonization of the Americas countries formerly ruled by the Spanish and Portuguese Empire, usually with a majority Hispanophone population. Collectively known as Hispanic America, this region includes Mexico, the majority of the Central and South American countries, and the Spanish-speaking island-nations of the Caribbean.

"Hispanic" is also used by people in the United States who are of Hispanic American origin (Hispanic and Latino Americans). Cultural elements (Spanish names, the Spanish language, Spanish customs, etc.) and people known as Hispanic can also be found in other areas that were formerly part of the Spanish or Portuguese Empire, such as in Equatorial Guinea in Africa or in the Spanish East Indies and Brazil (Portuguese in South America).

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA