Psychology & Psychiatry

How to maintain your mental wellness during the holidays

There are things people who are at risk of depression should keep in mind as they enter the holiday season, but Christmas isn't necessarily the mental health threat it's made out to be.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Why your New Year's resolution should be self-acceptance

A new year brings a season of change and the opportunity to focus on goals for the future. For many people, however, resolutions about weight loss and eating can often reinforce negative messages about bodies and prop up ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Psychologist explains how to improve the holiday blues

According to the song, it's the most wonderful time of the year. But for many, it's the time of year filled with added pressures, demands, and unrealistic expectations that leave them feeling decidedly less than wonderful.

Health

How to maintain quality sleep during the holiday travel season

With shorter daylight hours, busier than usual schedules and travel to different time zones, the holiday season can disrupt our circadian rhythm and create sleep difficulties—making it even harder to avoid stress, enjoy ...

Medical research

Tracking titin in real time

Using new high-resolution imaging techniques, MDC researchers and colleagues have tracked titin, the body's largest protein, in real time throughout its entire lifecycle. The method and results could provide new insight into ...

Cardiology

Protect your heart through the holiday season

(HealthDay)—It's never too soon to take steps to safeguard your heart health, and that includes being aware of seasonal heart attack triggers.

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Christmas and holiday season

The Christmas season, the (Christmas) holidays or the holiday season is a notable 2 to 4 month period that surrounds the Christmas holiday as well as other varying holidays. It is sometimes synonymous with the winter season, and is usually said to take place between approximately October and January. It has been found to have a proportionate effect on health, compared to the rest of the year. Its reference and naming by schools and governments has been the subject of controversy. It incorporates a period of shopping which comprises a peak season for the retail sector (the "Christmas shopping season"), and a period of sales at the end of the season (the "January sales").

The exact definition, name, and celebratory method of the period varies from culture to culture: According to Yanovski et al., in the United States the season "is generally considered to begin with Thanksgiving and end after New Year's Day". According to Axelrad, the season in the United States encompasses at least Christmas and New Year's Day, and also includes Saint Nicholas Day. The U.S. Fire Administration defines the winter holiday season as the period from December 1 to January 7. According to Chen et al., in China the Christmas/winter holiday season "is generally considered to begin with the winter solstice and end after the Lantern Festival". Some stores and shopping malls advertise their Christmas merchandise beginning after Halloween or even in late October, alongside Halloween items. In the UK Christmas food appears on supermarket shelves as early as September.

The precise definition of feasts and festival days that are encompassed by the Christmas/winter holiday season has become controversial over recent decades. Traditionally, the only holidays included in the "season" were Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, Boxing Day (in some countries), New Year's Eve, New Year's Day and Three Kings Day. In recent times, this definition has begun to expand to include Yule, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa, Thanksgiving and Black Friday. Due to the phenomenon of Christmas creep and the informal inclusion of American Thanksgiving, the "winter" holiday season has begun to extend into late autumn. (See also list of winter festivals.)

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA