Neuroscience

Defective intercellular connections cause hydrocephalus

About one in 2,000 babies are born with hydrocephalus, a condition in which cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cannot flow towards the spinal column and builds up instead in the cavities (ventricles) of the brain. This causes the ...

Neuroscience

Team discovers genetic dysfunction connected to hydrocephalus

The mysterious condition once known as "water on the brain" became just a bit less murky this week thanks to a global research group led in part by a Case Western Reserve researcher. Professor Anthony Wynshaw-Boris, MD, PhD, ...

Neuroscience

New hope for premature babies at risk of brain damage

(Medical Xpress)—Babies who suffer a bleed on their brain could be saved from debilitating brain damage after researchers at the University of Birmingham found that a new drug can prevent the swelling of the organ which ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Rainfall, brain infection linked in sub-Saharan Africa

(Medical Xpress)—The amount of rainfall affects the number of infant infections leading to hydrocephalus in Uganda, according to a team of researchers who are the first to demonstrate that these brain infections are linked ...

Medical research

Faulty development of immature brain cells causes hydrocephalus

Researchers at the University of Iowa have discovered a new cause of hydrocephalus, a devastating neurological disorder that affects between one and three of every 1,000 babies born. Working in mice, the researchers identified ...

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Hydrocephalus

Hydrocephalus ( /ˌhaɪdrɵˈsɛfələs/), also known as "water in the brain," is a medical condition in which there is an abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the ventricles, or cavities, of the brain. This may cause increased intracranial pressure inside the skull and progressive enlargement of the head, convulsion, tunnel vision, and mental disability. Hydrocephalus can also cause death. The name derives from the Greek words ὑδρο- (hudro-) "water", and κέφαλος (kephalos) "head".

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