Medical research

New hydrogel can repair tears in human tissue

EPFL scientists have developed an injectable gel that can attach to various kinds of soft internal tissues and repair tears resulting from an accident or trauma.

Health

Contact lenses for diagnostic and therapeutic use

Human bodily fluids and secretions contain molecules known as biomarkers that contain a wealth of information about the body's health and the presence of disease. Among secretions such as tears, sweat and saliva, tears are ...

Biomedical technology

Wearable pressure-sensitive devices for medical use

In recent years, the use of wearable sensing devices has become a part of people's everyday lives. Devices such as smart watches, for example, can be used to monitor physical fitness functions such as heart rate, sleep and ...

Medical research

Novel alkaline hydrogel advances skin wound care

With an increase in the elderly and aging population and also in the number of invasive surgeries, wound healing has become a critical focus area in medicine. The complex bodily processes involved in wound healing make it ...

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Gel

A gel (from the lat. gelu—freezing, cold, ice or gelatus—frozen, immobile) is a solid, jelly-like material that can have properties ranging from soft and weak to hard and tough. Gels are defined as a substantially dilute cross-linked system, which exhibits no flow when in the steady-state. By weight, gels are mostly liquid, yet they behave like solids due to a three-dimensional cross-linked network within the liquid. It is the crosslinks within the fluid that give a gel its structure (hardness) and contribute to stickiness (tack). In this way gels are a dispersion of molecules of a liquid within a solid in which the solid is the continuous phase and the liquid is the discontinuous phase.

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