Oncology & Cancer

Porous cells lead to poorer livers

Need another reason to think twice before ordering that extra helping of fries? It could lead to a higher risk of developing liver cancer. Cases of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH)—a type of fatty liver disease that ...

Immunology

Females found to itch less than males

Among the many reasons men may have for envying women, at least when it comes to skin inflammation, is that women have a significantly lower incidence of severe psoriasis. However, the underlying reason for the sex differences ...

Immunology

Research team discovers body's own anti-inflammatory substance

A team of scientists led by Professor Karsten Hiller from the Braunschweig Center for Systems Biology BRICS has discovered an endogenous, anti-inflammatory substance: mesaconic acid. This molecule could be a drug candidate ...

Oncology & Cancer

New antibody therapies fight cancer, drum up investment

Antibody therapies are offering promising treatment breakthroughs for cancer and other illnesses, generating greater investor interest more than 20 years after they were first commercialized.

Oncology & Cancer

Pushing T cells down 'memory lane' may improve cancer therapy

Scientists at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital identified a molecular mechanism that in a preclinical study unlocked the promise of CAR T-cell therapy for treatment of solid tumors. The results were published today in ...

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White blood cell

White blood cells (WBCs), or leukocytes (also spelled "leucocytes"), are cells of the immune system defending the body against both infectious disease and foreign materials. Five different and diverse types of leukocytes exist, but they are all produced and derived from a multipotent cell in the bone marrow known as a hematopoietic stem cell. Leukocytes are found throughout the body, including the blood and lymphatic system.

The number of leukocytes in the blood is often an indicator of disease. There are normally between 4×109 and 1.1×1010 white blood cells in a litre of blood, making up approximately 1% of blood in a healthy adult. An increase in the number of leukocytes over the upper limits is called leukocytosis, and in leukopenia, this number is much lower than the lower limit. The physical properties of leukocytes, such as volume, conductivity, and granularity, may change due to activation, the presence of immature cells, or the presence of malignant leukocytes in leukemia.

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