Neuroscience

Medical management alone better for brain AV malformations

(HealthDay)—Among patients with unruptured brain arteriovenous malformation, medical management alone is superior to its combination with interventional therapy for prevention of death or symptomatic stroke in the long ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Masks, travel restrictions, testing as virus cases surge

Governments and businesses are ramping up precautions as coronavirus case numbers rise to dire new levels in parts of the U.S. and around the world, potentially wiping out two months of progress.

Medical economics

Insurtech in a pandemic: Creating opportunities from threats

Researchers from Cass Business School suggest that Covid-19 will act as a catalyst for the industry-wide adoption of new digital initiatives in the insurance industry. They also suggest that the pandemic has uncovered the ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Germany orders first local virus lockdowns since easing

German authorities on Tuesday ordered fresh coronavirus lockdowns in two districts—the first since easing restrictions and a major setback for hopes of a swift return to normality.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

NYC takes 'biggest step' in reopening after virus crisis

New York City ventured into a crucial stage of reopening as stores let people in Monday, offices brought workers back, restaurants seated customers outdoors and residents both welcomed and worried about rebounding from the ...

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Industry

An industry (from Latin industrius, "diligent, industrious") is the manufacturing of a good or service within a category. Although industry is a broad term for any kind of economic production, in economics and urban planning industry is a synonym for the secondary sector, which is a type of economic activity involved in the manufacturing of raw materials into goods and products.

There are four key industrial economic sectors: the primary sector, largely raw material extraction industries such as mining and farming; the secondary sector, involving refining, construction, and manufacturing; the tertiary sector, which deals with services (such as law and medicine) and distribution of manufactured goods; and the quaternary sector, a relatively new type of knowledge industry focusing on technological research, design and development such as computer programming, and biochemistry. A fifth quinary sector has been proposed encompassing nonprofit activities. The economy is also broadly separated into public sector and private sector, with industry generally categorized as private. Industries are also any business or manufacturing.

Industry in the sense of manufacturing became a key sector of production and labour in European and North American countries during the Industrial Revolution, which upset previous mercantile and feudal economies through many successive rapid advances in technology, such as the steel and coal production. It is aided by technological advances, and has continued to develop into new types and sectors to this day. Industrial countries then assumed a capitalist economic policy. Railroads and steam-powered ships began speedily establishing links with previously unreachable world markets, enabling private companies to develop to then-unheard of size and wealth. Following the Industrial Revolution, perhaps a third of the world's economic output is derived from manufacturing industries—more than agriculture's share.

Many developed countries (for example the UK, the U.S., and Canada) and many developing/semi-developed countries (People's Republic of China, India etc.) depend significantly on industry. Industries, the countries they reside in, and the economies of those countries are interlinked in a complex web of interdependence.

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