Health

How hospitals respond to wildfires

Wildfires are becoming worse and more frequent. Massive plumes of smoke—more dangerous than urban pollution—disperse across entire continents, spreading inhalable particles that can cause smoke-related fatalities and ...

Medications

Triple-drug therapy safely cuts serious asthma flares

Researchers have found that the inclusion of a third drug to commonly used dual-drug inhalers can reduce asthma exacerbations and improve control over the disease in children, adolescents, and adults with moderate-to-severe ...

Immunology

'Smart' asthma inhaler sensors improve pediatric asthma control

Sensor-based inhalers integrated into health care providers' clinical workflows may help improve medication adherence and support children with asthma—and their families—to more effectively manage this condition, according ...

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Inhalation

Inhalation (also known as inspiration) is the movement of air from the external environment, through the air ways, and into the alveoli.

Inhalation begins with the onset of contraction of the diaphragm, which results in expansion of the intrapleural space and an increase in negative pressure according to Boyle's Law. This negative pressure generates airflow because of the pressure difference between the atmosphere and alveolus. Air enters, inflating the lung through either the nose or the mouth into the pharynx (throat) and trachea before entering the alveoli.

Other muscles that can be involved in inhalation include:

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