Psychology & Psychiatry

Balance test improves insight into illness in schizophrenia

A common symptom of schizophrenia - not knowing that you're ill—can be temporarily alleviated using a balance test that stimulates part of the brain with cold water, an exploratory study at the Centre for Addiction and ...

Neuroscience

'But doctor, I'm not ill'—insight in psychotic patients

How do you convince someone with schizophrenia or other psychotic disorders that they are ill if they don't want to believe it? If you don't recognize that you are ill, you may resist treatment, but is there something which ...

Neuroscience

What sudden insights look like inside the brain

Insight—you know the feeling. It's that amazing idea, the solution that hits you like a bolt of lightning. It can come to you while you're mulling over a problem, or days later, when you're making a sandwich or mowing the ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Spontaneous thoughts are perceived to reveal meaningful self-insight

Spontaneous thoughts, intuitions, dreams and quick impressions. We all have these seemingly random thoughts popping into our minds on a daily basis. The question is what do we make of these unplanned, spur-of-the-moment thoughts? ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Why we think we're good at something when we're not

(Medical Xpress)—Reality TV has a way of highlighting the worst in people, even when they genuinely think they're doing their best. American Idol is just one example, in which contestants who can't carry a tune are shocked ...

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Insight

Insight is the understanding of a specific cause and effect in a specific context. Insight can be used with several related meanings:

An insight that manifests itself suddenly, such as understanding how to solve a difficult problem, is sometimes called by the German word Aha-Erlebnis. The term was coined by the German psychologist and theoretical linguist Karl Bühler. It is also known as an epiphany.

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