Medical research

Lab-grown fat cells help scientists understand type 2 diabetes

In research published June 17 in the journal Science Advances, researchers in the lab of Whitehead Institute Founding Member Rudolf Jaenisch present a way to create fat cells that can be modified to display different levels ...

Oncology & Cancer

The paired perils of breast cancer and diabetes

Breast cancer and type 2 diabetes would seem to be distinctly different diseases, with commonality only in their commonality. Breast cancer is the second most diagnosed malignancy after some types of skin cancer; approximately ...

Diabetes

Early prediction of diabetes using AI

Artificial intelligence can be used to predict the onset of diabetes mellitus given sufficient patient information according to work published in the International Journal of Business Intelligence and Systems Engineering.

Cardiology

High-fat diet induces high blood pressure in rat kidneys

A high-fat diet after 16 weeks induced hypertension in rats, according to researchers from Henry Ford Health and Wayne State University in Detroit. High blood pressure can lead to narrowing of the blood vessels throughout ...

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Insulin resistance

Insulin resistance (IR) is the condition in which normal amounts of insulin are inadequate to produce a normal insulin response from fat, muscle and liver cells. Insulin resistance in fat cells reduces the effects of insulin and results in elevated hydrolysis of stored triglycerides in the absence of measures which either increase insulin sensitivity or which provide additional insulin. Increased mobilization of stored lipids in these cells elevates free fatty acids in the blood plasma. Insulin resistance in muscle cells reduces glucose uptake (and so local storage of glucose as glycogen), whereas insulin resistance in liver cells results in impaired glycogen synthesis and a failure to suppress glucose production. Elevated blood fatty acid levels (associated with insulin resistance and diabetes mellitus Type 2), reduced muscle glucose uptake, and increased liver glucose production all contribute to elevated blood glucose levels. High plasma levels of insulin and glucose due to insulin resistance are believed to be the origin of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes, including its complications.

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