Diabetes

Could resetting our internal clocks help control diabetes?

The circadian clock system (from the Latin "circa diem," about a day) allows organisms to anticipate periodic changes of geophysical time and to adjust to those changes. Nearly all cells comprise molecular clocks that regulate ...

Medical research

Removing body clock gene protects mice against pneumonia

Removing the clock gene BMAL1 makes bacteria-engulfing defense cells in the body more effective, a University of Manchester and University of Oxford study published in the journal PNAS has found.

Health

How to maintain quality sleep during the holiday travel season

With shorter daylight hours, busier than usual schedules and travel to different time zones, the holiday season can disrupt our circadian rhythm and create sleep difficulties—making it even harder to avoid stress, enjoy ...

Medical research

Research discovers link between stress and circadian clock health

The human body has an internal biological clock that is constantly running. Our well-being is dependent on the function of that clock. New research from the University of Minnesota Medical School found a little stress can ...

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Circadian rhythm

A circadian rhythm is a roughly-24-hour cycle in the biochemical, physiological or behavioral processes of living entities, including plants, animals, fungi and cyanobacteria (see bacterial circadian rhythms). The term "circadian", coined by Franz Halberg, comes from the Latin circa, "around," and diem or dies, "day", meaning literally "approximately one day." The formal study of biological temporal rhythms such as daily, tidal, weekly, seasonal, and annual rhythms, is called chronobiology.

Circadian rhythms are endogenously generated, and can be entrained by external cues, called Zeitgebers, the primary one of which is daylight. These rhythms allow organisms to anticipate and prepare for precise and regular environmental changes.

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