Health

Host-microbe interactions in the gut

Although the mutually beneficial relationship between human beings and gut microbes is clear, how we—the host—affect the functions of gut microbial communities remains poorly understood.

Immunology

Immune cells drive gallstone formation

Sticky meshworks of DNA and proteins extruded by white blood cells called neutrophils act as the glue that binds together calcium and cholesterol crystals during gallstone formation, researchers in Germany report August 15 ...

Immunology

Intestinal immune cell interactions

Multiple types of immune cells are interspersed among the epithelial cells lining the intestines and are considered to be a first line of defense against pathogens. The survival and interaction of these intraepithelial lymphocytes ...

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Intestine

In anatomy, the intestine (or bowel) is the segment of the alimentary canal extending from the stomach to the anus and, in humans and other mammals, consists of two segments, the small intestine and the large intestine. In humans, the small intestine is further subdivided into the duodenum, jejunum and ileum while the large intestine is subdivided into the cecum and colon.

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