Cancer

Diagnostic radiation exposure safe for children, experts state

In an article published in the June 2017 issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, researchers assert that exposure to medical imaging radiation not only doesn't increase an adult person's risk of getting cancer, it doesn't ...

Other

Lab keeps cancer treatment radiation machines honest

As radiation sources used to map disease and attack cancer grow in number and complexity, a University of Wisconsin—Madison center continues to offer the last word on accurate radiation doses.

Surgery

Some radiation okay for expectant mother and fetus

According to a new study in the Journal of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (JAAOS), imaging studies necessary to diagnose traumatic injuries sustained by pregnant women are safe when used properly.

Medical research

Detecting blood clots with portable device

Blockages in lung arteries could be diagnosed safely in real-time helping as many as 20,000 respiratory patients in Australia each year with emerging technology being developed by electrical engineering researchers at the ...

Cancer

A new cellular response to radiation exposure

Almost the entire human genome is transcribed into RNA, but only a fraction of this is actually used to produce protein. The function of the majority of the RNA, the so-called "non-coding transcriptome" remains an enigma. ...

Medical research

Low-dose radiation impacts skin sensitivity

In experiments where human skin tissue samples were exposed to low doses of ionizing radiation, scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that a skin tissue model showed perturbations that suggest its stability ...

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Ionizing radiation

Ionizing radiation consists of subatomic particles or electromagnetic waves that are energetic enough to detach electrons from atoms or molecules, ionizing them. The occurrence of ionization depends on the energy of the impinging individual particles or waves, and not on their number. An intense flood of particles or waves will not cause ionization if these particles or waves do not carry enough energy to be ionizing. Roughly speaking, particles or photons with energies above a few electron volts (eV) are ionizing.

Examples of ionizing particles are energetic alpha particles, beta particles, and neutrons. The ability of electromagnetic waves (photons) to ionize an atom or molecule depends on their wavelength. Radiation on the short wavelength end of the electromagnetic spectrum - ultraviolet, x-rays, and gamma rays - is ionizing.

Ionizing radiation comes from radioactive materials, x-ray tubes, particle accelerators, and is present in the environment. It is invisible and undetectable by human senses, so instruments such as geiger counters are required to detect its presence. It has many practical uses in medicine, research, construction, and other areas, but presents a health hazard if used improperly. Exposure to radiation causes microscopic damage to living tissue, resulting in skin burns, radiation sickness and death at high doses and cancer, tumors and genetic damage at low doses.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA