Pediatrics

Want to breastfeed? These five things will make it easier

More than 90 percent of Australian women start breastfeeding soon after the birth of their baby, but only 15 percent are exclusively breastfeeding at six months, despite national and international recommendations.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

ASN: High-dose, proactive IV iron noninferior in hemodialysis

(HealthDay)—For patients undergoing maintenance hemodialysis, a high-dose intravenous iron regimen administered proactively is noninferior to a low-dose intravenous iron regimen administered reactively, according to a study ...

Medical research

Fat tissue's "iron sink"

Adipose tissue, commonly called "body fat," stores excess fatty acids and supplies it back when the need arises. Finely balanced iron levels are important for the health of adipocytes, the cells that make up adipose tissue. ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Our brains process irony in emojis, words in the same way

That winky-face emoji that you use at the end of a text isn't just a fun picture added to your sentence. It can convey linguistic meaning that changes the interpretation of the sentence, a new study finds.

Genetics

New treatment for iron overload on trial

A world-first trial of a treatment for Australia's most common genetic disorder is being led by a University of Queensland researcher.

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Iron

Iron (pronounced /ˈаɪ.ərn/) is a chemical element with the symbol Fe (Latin: ferrum) and atomic number 26. Iron is a group 8 and period 4 element. Iron and iron alloys (steels) are by far the most common metals and the most common ferromagnetic materials in everyday use. Fresh iron surfaces are lustrous and silvery-grey in colour, but oxidise in air to form a red or brown coating of ferrous oxide or rust. Pure single crystals of iron are soft (softer than aluminium), and the addition of minute amounts of impurities, such as carbon, significantly strengthens them. Alloying iron with appropriate small amounts (up to a few per cent) of other metals and carbon produces steel, which can be 1,000 times harder than pure iron.

Iron-56 is the heaviest stable isotope produced by the alpha process in stellar nucleosynthesis; heavier elements than iron and nickel require a supernova for their formation. Iron is the most abundant element in the core of red giants, and is the most abundant metal in iron meteorites and in the dense metal cores of planets such as Earth.

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