Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

How blocking iron drives the lung immune system to control infection

Although COVID-19 commands the headlines today, tuberculosis (TB) remains the biggest infection killer in the world and multiple drug resistant TB, which does not respond to regular antibiotics, continues to be a major threat ...

Oncology & Cancer

Small red blood cells could indicate cancer

Having abnormally small red blood cells—a condition known as microcytosis—could indicate cancer, according to new research led by a University of Exeter student working with a world-leading team.

Medical research

Ventilators: Three centuries in the making

From bed-sized iron lungs to portable, computer-controlled systems, the ventilators used to treat life-threatening respiratory diseases—and so much in demand today—have had a 'remarkable journey."

Medications

Iron chelation therapy treats iron overload in MDS

(HealthDay)—Iron chelation therapy (ICT) seems beneficial for iron-overloaded patients with low- or intermediate-1-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), according to a study published online March 24 in the Annals of Internal ...

Neuroscience

The brain may need iron for healthy cognitive development

Iron levels in brain tissue rise during development and are correlated with cognitive abilities, according to research in children and young adults recently published in JNeurosci. Future work could lead to iron supplementation ...

page 1 from 32

Iron

Iron (pronounced /ˈаɪ.ərn/) is a chemical element with the symbol Fe (Latin: ferrum) and atomic number 26. Iron is a group 8 and period 4 element. Iron and iron alloys (steels) are by far the most common metals and the most common ferromagnetic materials in everyday use. Fresh iron surfaces are lustrous and silvery-grey in colour, but oxidise in air to form a red or brown coating of ferrous oxide or rust. Pure single crystals of iron are soft (softer than aluminium), and the addition of minute amounts of impurities, such as carbon, significantly strengthens them. Alloying iron with appropriate small amounts (up to a few per cent) of other metals and carbon produces steel, which can be 1,000 times harder than pure iron.

Iron-56 is the heaviest stable isotope produced by the alpha process in stellar nucleosynthesis; heavier elements than iron and nickel require a supernova for their formation. Iron is the most abundant element in the core of red giants, and is the most abundant metal in iron meteorites and in the dense metal cores of planets such as Earth.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA