Neuroscience

Why a little baby talk is good for your toddler

Has anyone ever told you: "Don't baby talk to your baby?" Parents of young infants often tell us that they have heard this advice from friends, family and even health care professionals.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Chatty kids do better at school

Young children go on to achieve more academic success when their verbal skills are enhanced, a new study suggests.

Medical research

Household chemical use linked to child language delays

Young children from low-income homes whose mothers reported frequent use of toxic chemicals such as household cleaners were more likely to show delays in language development by age 2, a new study found.

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

How a Canadian start-up used AI to track China virus

On the shores of Lake Ontario, a Canadian start-up raised one of the earliest alarms about the risk posed by the mystery virus that emerged in the Chinese city of Wuhan. How did it do it? Artificial intelligence.

Neuroscience

Child brain is not just an adult brain in a smaller size

A study at the University of Jyväskylä indicated that children's brains have special features not found in adult brains. For the brain, childhood and youth are special stages, as the neural networks are then especially ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Hardship could harm children's language skills

Children from disadvantaged backgrounds are three times more likely to develop difficulties with language than those from more affluent areas, research suggests.

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Language development

Since language development is the crucial part of the human cognitive nature, understanding language development is an important aspect to understand the base and to recall its various components of linguistics. And as to their universality, the cognitive aspect of communication in language is understood as similar among primates, non-primates, and human in some aspects, and differs in other aspects in term of:

Language development is a process starting early in human life, when a person begins to acquire language by learning it as it is spoken and by mimicry. Children's language development moves from simple to complex[citation needed]. Infants start without language. Yet by four months of age, babies can read lips and discriminate speech sounds. The language that infants speak is called babbling.

Usually, language starts off as recall of simple words without associated meaning, but as children grow, words acquire meaning, with connections between words formed. In time, sentences start as words are joined together to create logical meaning. As a person gets older, new meanings and new associations are created and vocabulary increases as more words are learned.

Infants use their bodies, vocal cries and other preverbal vocalizations to communicate their wants, needs and dispositions. Even though most children begin to vocalize and eventually verbalize at various ages and at different rates, they learn their first language without conscious instruction from parents or caretakers. In fact research has shown that the earliest learning begins in utero when the fetus can recognize the sounds and speech patterns of its mother's voice.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA