Neuroscience

New research sheds light on the brain's GPS system

Grid cells are the brain's GPS system. But do they use brain waves to gather information about speed and direction? Researchers at the University of Oslo resolved the question.

Neuroscience

Measuring brain blood flow and activity with light

A new, noninvasive method for measuring brain blood flow with light has been developed by biomedical engineers and neurologists at the University of California, Davis, and used to detect brain activation. The new method, ...

Neuroscience

Using light instead of electricity in cochlear implants

A team of researchers affiliated with multiple institutions in Germany has developed a cochlear implant that converts sound waves to light signals instead of electrical signals. In their paper published in the journal Science ...

Ophthalmology

Low-cost retinal scanner could help prevent blindness worldwide

Biomedical engineers at Duke University have developed a low-cost, portable optical coherence tomography (OCT) scanner that promises to bring the vision-saving technology to underserved regions throughout the United States ...

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Light

Light is electromagnetic radiation, particularly radiation of a wavelength that is visible to the human eye (about 400–700 nm, or perhaps 380–750 nm.) In physics, the term light sometimes refers to electromagnetic radiation of any wavelength, whether visible or not.

Three primary properties of light are:

Light, which exists in tiny "packets" called photons, exhibits properties of both waves and particles. This property is referred to as the wave–particle duality. The study of light, known as optics, is an important research area in modern physics.

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