Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Oxytocin can help prevent osteoporosis

Oxytocin, produced by the hypothalamus and sometimes known as the "love hormone" for its involvement in pair bonding and orgasm, can be a strong ally in the control and prevention of osteoporosis, according to a study by ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Arguments between couples: Our neurons like mediation

When couples argue, mediation by a third party improves the outcome of the confrontation. But that's not all: mediation is also linked to heightened activity in key regions of the brain belonging to the reward circuit—this ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

What is love?

From songs and poems to novels and movies, romantic love is one of the most enduring subjects for artworks through the ages. But what about the science?

Psychology & Psychiatry

Are we wired for romance? fMRI imaging and genetic analysis say yes

If you've ever been a newlywed, you know the tingly euphoria of saying "I do" and starting a life with your spouse. This is romantic love, Western style. We often chalk it up to "chemistry," an ill-defined connection of hearts ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Why heart-racing romantic feelings fade over time

You know the feeling—the warm, heart-skipping sensation that comes with romantic love. It happens when your brain releases certain feel-good chemicals, stemming from a powerful attraction.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Video: Can you be addicted to being in love?

Being in love. It can take the shape of a long-term intimate partnership, or become an obsessive source of emotional excitement and distraction. When does being in love become similar to addiction, and can you be addicted ...

Neuroscience

'Love hormone' improves attachment issues in people with autism

Oxytocin, often dubbed the "love hormone," is known to promote social bonding. Researchers at KU Leuven have now discovered that administering oxytocin to adult men with autism makes them more open to close emotional bonds ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Feeling loved in everyday life linked with improved well-being

Poets and songwriters may tend to focus their artistry on passion and romance, but it may be those unsung, brief feelings of love throughout the day that are connected with psychological well-being, according to a team of ...

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Love

Love is an emotion of strong affection and personal attachment. In philosophical context, love is a virtue representing all of human kindness, compassion, and affection. Love is central to many religions, as in the Christian phrase, "God is love" or Agape in the Canonical gospels. Love may also be described as actions towards others (or oneself) based on compassion, or as actions towards others based on affection.

In English, love refers to a variety of different feelings, states, and attitudes, ranging from pleasure ("I loved that meal") to interpersonal attraction ("I love my partner"). "Love" may refer specifically to the passionate desire and intimacy of romantic love, to the sexual love of eros, to the emotional closeness of familial love, or the platonic love that defines friendship, to the profound oneness or devotion of religious love. This diversity of uses and meanings, combined with the complexity of the feelings involved, makes love unusually difficult to consistently define, even compared to other emotional states.

Love in its various forms acts as a major facilitator of interpersonal relationships and, owing to its central psychological importance, is one of the most common themes in the creative arts.

Love may be understood a part of the survival instinct, a function keep human beings together against menaces and to facilitate the continuation of the species.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA