Oncology & Cancer

Lumpectomy + radiation may cut breast cancer mortality in DCIS

(HealthDay)—Treatment with lumpectomy and radiotherapy is associated with a reduction in breast cancer mortality versus lumpectomy or mastectomy alone among patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), according to a ...

Oncology & Cancer

Trends in reoperation after initial lumpectomy for breast cancer

Monica Morrow, M.D., of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, and coauthors investigated the impact of a 2014 consensus statement endorsing a minimal negative margin for invasive breast cancer on postlumpectomy ...

Oncology & Cancer

Treatment patterns for DCIS shift from 1991 to 2010

(HealthDay)—There were substantial shifts in treatment patterns for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) from 1991 to 2010, with more women opting for lumpectomy and radiation therapy rather than single mastectomy, according ...

Surgery

Tissue testing during breast cancer lumpectomies

Unique laboratory testing during breast cancer lumpectomies to make sure surgeons remove all cancerous tissue spares patients the need for a repeat lumpectomy in roughly 96 percent of cases at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, a ...

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Lumpectomy

Lumpectomy (aka: tylectomy) is a common surgical procedure designed to remove a discrete lump, usually a benign tumor or breast cancer, from an affected man or woman's breast. As the tissue removed is generally quite limited and the procedure relatively non-invasive, compared to a mastectomy, a lumpectomy is considered a viable means of "breast conservation" or "breast preservation" surgery with all the attendant physical and emotional advantages of such an approach.

According to the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines, lumpectomy may be performed for ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS), for invasive ductal carcinoma, or for other conditions.

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