Immunology

Human fetal lungs harbor a microbiome signature

The lungs and placentas of fetuses in the womb—as young as 11 weeks after conception—already show a bacterial microbiome signature, which suggests that bacteria may colonize the lungs well before birth. This first-time ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Obesity, heart disease, and diabetes may be communicable

Non-communicable diseases including heart disease, cancer and lung disease are now the most common causes of death, accounting for 70 percent of deaths worldwide. These diseases are considered "non-communicable" because they ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Mortality rate is cut in half by a lung rescue team

A specialized Lung Rescue Team established by clinicians at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) to evaluate and treat patients with obesity receiving mechanical ventilation (MV) due to acute respiratory failure (ARF) has ...

Pediatrics

Reduced inhaler use is safe for infants with bronchiolitis

Bronchiolitis, a lung infection that is one of the most common reasons for hospitalizations in young children, is most prevalent during the winter months and is usually treated with albuterol delivered via inhalers, despite ...

Immunology

Boost to lung immunity following infection

The strength of the immune system in response to respiratory infections is constantly changing, depending on the history of previous, unrelated infections, according to new research from the Crick.

Pediatrics

Infant lungs and bushfire smoke

Everyone at the Murdoch Children's Research Institute extends their heartfelt sympathy and condolences to those affected by the devastating Australian bushfire situation, which unfortunately looks likely to continue in the ...

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Lung

The lung or pulmonary system is the essential respiration organ in air-breathing animals, including most tetrapods, a few fish and a few snails. In mammals and the more complex life forms, the two lungs are located in the chest on either side of the heart. Their principal function is to transport oxygen from the atmosphere into the bloodstream, and to release carbon dioxide from the bloodstream into the atmosphere. This exchange of gases is accomplished in the mosaic of specialized cells that form millions of tiny, exceptionally thin-walled air sacs called alveoli.

In order to completely explain the anatomy of the lungs, it is necessary to discuss the passage of air through the mouth to the alveoli. Once air progresses through the mouth or nose, it travels through the oropharynx, nasopharynx, the larynx, the trachea, and a progressively subdividing system of bronchi and bronchioles until it finally reaches the alveoli where the gas exchange of carbon dioxide and oxygen takes place.

The drawing and expulsion of air (ventilation) is driven by muscular action; in early tetrapods, air was driven into the lungs by the pharyngeal muscles, whereas in reptiles, birds and mammals a more complicated musculoskeletal system is used.

Medical terms related to the lung often begin with pulmo-, from the Latin pulmonarius ("of the lungs"), or with pneumo- (from Greek πνεύμων "lung")

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA