Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

TB doesn't only attack the lungs—other organs are also vulnerable

The world marks World Tuberculosis (TB) Day on March 24 every year. Most people assume that TB only affects the lungs – but the disease can also attack other organs. The Conversation Africa's Ina Skosana spoke to Professor ...

Cancer

Solving the 'Catch-22' of rectal cancer

Today's standard procedure to treat rectal cancer includes radical surgery to remove the tumour along with the rectum and its encasing tissue (called mesorectum). After the surgery, the specimen is analysed in the pathology ...

Cancer

A peek into lymph nodes

The vast majority of cancer deaths occur due to the spread of cancer from one organ to another, which can happen either through the blood or the lymphatic system. However, it can be tricky to detect this early enough. Researchers ...

Immunology

Gut immune cells play by their own rules

Only a few vaccines—for example, against polio and rotavirus—can be given orally. Most must be delivered by injection. Weizmann Institute of Science researchers suggest this may be, in part, because the training program ...

Cancer

Lymphadenectomy does not up survival in advanced ovarian cancer

(HealthDay)—For patients with advanced ovarian cancer who have undergone intra-abdominal macroscopically complete resection and have clinically negative lymph nodes, lymphadenectomy is not associated with longer overall ...

Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Mayo Clinic Q&A: What is cat scratch fever?

Dear Mayo Clinic: My cat scratched me while I was trimming his claws and the wound later became infected. Are cat scratches a special concern?

Cancer

How do metastatic tumor cells grow in lymph nodes?

The spread of cancer to a new part of the body accounts for about 90 percent of cancer deaths. Cancer cells can spread from sites of origin to other parts of the body through blood vessels (blood-borne metastasis) or the ...

Immunology

Study reveals how immune cells target different tissues

For the first time, researchers have revealed the different molecular identities of important immune cells, called T regulatory cells, using single cell genomics, in both mouse and human peripheral non-lymphoid tissues such ...

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Lymph node

A Lymph node (pronounced /ˈlɪmf noʊd/) is an organ consisting of many types of cells, and is a part of the lymphatic system. Lymph nodes are found all through the body, and act as filters or traps for foreign particles. They contain white blood cells that use oxygen to process. Thus they are important in the proper functioning of the immune system.

Lymph nodes also have clinical significance. They become inflamed or enlarged in various conditions, which may range from trivial, such as a throat infection, to life-threatening such as cancers. In the latter, the condition of lymph nodes is so significant that it is used for cancer staging, which decides the treatment to be employed, and for determining the prognosis.

Lymph nodes can also be diagnosed by biopsy whenever they are inflamed. Certain diseases affect lymph nodes with characteristic consistency and location.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA