Medical research

No time to be complacent about polio in Australia

Despite being declared polio-free in 2000, Australia consistently fails to reach some World Health Organization (WHO) benchmarks for adequate surveillance, showing a "level of complacency among physicians," say the authors ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

Auditory hallucinations rooted in aberrant brain connectivity

Auditory hallucinations, a phenomenon in which people hear voices or other sounds in the absence of external stimuli, are a feature of schizophrenia and some other neuropsychiatric disorders. How they arise in the brain has ...

Psychology & Psychiatry

How you can supercharge your brain from the comfort of your home

As I drove to pick up a black raspberry soft-serve, I noticed my mind racing. After months of isolation, I needed a 5-minute brain break—a strategy to slow down my brain that I learned from a new online study called The ...

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Magnetism

In physics, magnetism is one of the forces in which materials and moving charged particles exert attractive, repulsive force or moments on other materials or charged particles. Some well-known materials that exhibit easily detectable magnetic properties (called magnets) are nickel, iron, cobalt, gadolinium and their alloys; however, all materials are influenced to greater or lesser degree by the presence of a magnetic field. Substances that are negligibly affected by magnetic fields are known as non-magnetic substances. They include copper, aluminium, water, and gases.

Magnetism also has other definitions and descriptions in physics, particularly as one of the two components of electromagnetic waves such as light.

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