Cardiology

Does your insurance card matter when you have a heart attack?

Medicaid reimbursement to health care facilities on ST-elevation myocardial management—or STEMI, a serious form of a heart attack—is often lower when compared with the reimbursement rate of private insurance, according ...

Obstetrics & gynaecology

Pre-pregnancy health coverage climbs after Medicaid expansion

The number of low-income women enrolled in Medicaid before becoming pregnant rose substantially in states that expanded Medicaid eligibility through the Affordable Care Act, according to researchers at Columbia University ...

Health

Insurance coverage for adult obesity care increasing

(HealthDay)—Coverage for adult obesity care improved substantially in Medicaid and state employee insurance programs between 2009 and 2017, according to a study published online Nov. 14 in Obesity to coincide with the annual ...

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Medicaid

Medicaid is the United States health program for eligible individuals and families with low incomes and resources. It is a means-tested program that is jointly funded by the states and federal government, and is managed by the states. Among the groups of people served by Medicaid are certain eligible U.S. citizens and resident aliens, including low-income adults and their children, and people with certain disabilities. Poverty alone does not necessarily qualify an individual for Medicaid. It is estimated that approximately 60 percent of poor Americans are not covered by Medicaid. Medicaid is the largest source of funding for medical and health-related services for people with limited income in the United States. Because of the aging population, the fastest growing aspect of Medicaid is nursing home coverage.

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