Medical economics

Medicaid expansion buffered health coverage loss during pandemic

Unemployment-related health insurance coverage loss during COVID-19 was higher in states without Medicaid enrollment, whereas Medicaid enrollment occurred more often in Medicaid expansion states, according to a study published ...

Medical economics

Suicides less common in states that passed Medicaid expansion

Although there have been steady increases over the past 20 years in the number of people nationwide who die by suicide, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found that such increases have ...

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Medicaid

Medicaid is the United States health program for eligible individuals and families with low incomes and resources. It is a means-tested program that is jointly funded by the states and federal government, and is managed by the states. Among the groups of people served by Medicaid are certain eligible U.S. citizens and resident aliens, including low-income adults and their children, and people with certain disabilities. Poverty alone does not necessarily qualify an individual for Medicaid. It is estimated that approximately 60 percent of poor Americans are not covered by Medicaid. Medicaid is the largest source of funding for medical and health-related services for people with limited income in the United States. Because of the aging population, the fastest growing aspect of Medicaid is nursing home coverage.

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