Health

Legal marijuana industry toasts year of global gains

The last year was a 12-month champagne toast for the legal marijuana industry as the global market exploded and cannabis pushed its way further into the financial and cultural mainstream.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Does smoking marijuana cause teen behavior problems or vice versa?

As dozens of states move toward legalizing marijuana—for both medical and recreational purposes—scientists and parents have asked what the impact might be on children. Will more teens use pot? Will doing so cause behavioral ...

Health

Green Tuesday: Crowds line up at 1st East Coast pot shops

People lined up in the rain Tuesday morning to be among the first customers at the first two legal pot shops on the U.S. East Coast, more than two years after Massachusetts voters approved of recreational marijuana for adults.

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Medical cannabis

Medical cannabis (commonly referred to as "medical marijuana") refers to the use of the Cannabis plant as a physician-recommended drug or herbal therapy, as well as synthetic tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and other cannabinoids. There are many studies regarding the use of cannabis in a medicinal context. Use generally requires a prescription, and distribution is usually done within a framework defined by local laws. There are several methods for administration of dosage, including vaporizing or smoking dried buds, drinking or eating extracts, and taking synthetic THC pills. The comparible efficacy of these methods was the subject of an investigative study by the National Institutes of Health.

Medicinal use of cannabis is legal in a limited number of territories worldwide, including Canada, Austria, the Netherlands, Spain, Israel, Finland, and Portugal. In the United States, 13 states have recognized medical marijuana: Alaska, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Vermont and Washington; although California, Colorado, New Mexico and Rhode Island are currently the only states to utilize "dispensaries" to sell medical cannabis.

Seven U.S. states are currently considering medical marijuana bills in their legislatures: Illinois, Pennsylvania, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York and North Carolina. South Dakota also has several petitions in interest of medical marijuana legalization.

Cannabis has a long history of medicinal use in many cultures. The U.S. federal government, as represented by the Department of Health and Human Services, holds a patent for medical marijuana. Yet, medical cannabis remains a controversial issue worldwide. The Supreme Court ruled in 2005 that the Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution allowed the government to ban the use of cannabis, including medical use; the Food and Drug Administration states that "marijuana... has no currently accepted medical use in treatment in the United States".

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA