Alzheimer's disease & dementia

A healthy lifestyle is associated with more years without Alzheimer's

A U.S. study published by The BMJ today suggests that a healthy lifestyle is associated with a longer life expectancy among both men and women, and they live a larger proportion of their remaining years without Alzheimer's ...

Health

Research says fad diets don't work: Why are they so popular?

Two years into a pandemic that landed people in their living rooms, generating countless hours of television binging and stress eating, the nation has a new problem to worry about: Nearly half of U.S. adults, many already ...

Health

Midlife diet could help you eat your way to a healthy brain

People who eat a healthy diet during middle age have a larger brain volume than those with less healthy diets, new research reveals, suggesting food choices in midlife may reduce the risk of dementia and other degenerative ...

Medications

Nutrients can mimic pharmacological effects of medicines

Nutrients can work in surprisingly similar ways as medicines. Pharmacologists from Utrecht University conclude that more knowledge of the similarities between food and medicines could help develop diets to combat diseases.

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Mediterranean diet

The Mediterranean diet is a modern nutritional recommendation inspired by the traditional dietary patterns of some of the countries of the Mediterranean Basin.

The most commonly-understood version of the Mediterranean diet was presented by Dr. Walter Willett of Harvard University's School of Public Health in the mid-1990s. Based on "food patterns typical of Crete, much of the rest of Greece, and southern Italy in the early 1960s", this diet, in addition to "regular physical activity," emphasizes "abundant plant foods, fresh fruit as the typical daily dessert, olive oil as the principal source of fat, dairy products (principally cheese and yogurt), and fish and poultry consumed in low to moderate amounts, zero to four eggs consumed weekly, red meat consumed in low amounts, and wine consumed in low to moderate amounts". Total fat in this diet is 25% to 35% of calories, with saturated fat at 8% or less of calories.

The principal aspects of this diet include high olive oil consumption, high consumption of legumes, high consumption of unrefined cereals, high consumption of fruits, high consumption of vegetables, moderate consumption of dairy products (mostly as cheese and yogurt), moderate to high consumption of fish, low consumption of meat and meat products, and moderate wine consumption.

This diet is not typical of all Mediterranean cuisine. In Northern Italy, for instance, lard and butter are commonly used in cooking, and olive oil is reserved for dressing salads and cooked vegetables. In North Africa wine is traditionally avoided by Muslims. In both North Africa and the Levant, along with olive oil, sheep's tail fat and rendered butter (samna) are traditional staple fats.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA