Pediatrics

What to know before giving your child melatonin

Sleep plays a big role in your child's physical and mental well-being. If your kid is struggling with falling and staying asleep, you might find yourself turning to melatonin—an over-the-counter sleep aid—to help them.

Medications

2012 to 2021 saw increase in pediatric ingestions of melatonin

From 2012 to 2021, there was an increase in the annual number of pediatric ingestions of melatonin, with a total of 260,435 ingestions reported during the study period; these statistics were published in the June 3 issue ...

Health

How to start preparing for Daylight Saving Time

Daylight Saving Time offers extra sunlight for longer spring and summer evenings, but a sleep expert at Baylor College of Medicine says it is not always the best transition for our internal clock.

Medications

Prevalence of melatonin supplement use increased over time

(HealthDay)—The reported prevalence of melatonin supplement consumption increased significantly from 1999-2000 to 2017-2018, with prevalence of use of more than 5 mg/day also increasing, starting in 2005 to 2006, according ...

Health

Can oily fish, cherries or milk help you sleep?

Almost one-in-five British people report they don't get enough sleep each night. The problem is so bad that in total the UK public are losing around a night's worth of shut-eye each week.

Inflammatory disorders

Melatonin exacerbates asthma

Asthma sufferers generally find their condition gets worse at night. Now, a research group may understand why. Melatonin, a sleep hormone that is sometimes prescribed to treat insomnia, exasperates the constriction of the ...

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Melatonin

Melatonin i/ˌmɛləˈtoʊnɪn/, also known chemically as N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine, is a naturally occurring compound found in animals, plants, and microbes. In animals, circulating levels of the hormone melatonin vary in a daily cycle, thereby allowing the entrainment of the circadian rhythms of several biological functions.

Many biological effects of melatonin are produced through activation of melatonin receptors, while others are due to its role as a pervasive and powerful antioxidant, with a particular role in the protection of nuclear and mitochondrial DNA.

In mammals, melatonin is secreted into the blood by the pineal gland in the brain. Known as the "hormone of darkness," it is secreted in darkness in both day-active (diurnal) and night-active (nocturnal) animals.

It may also be produced by a variety of peripheral cells such as bone marrow cells, lymphocytes, and epithelial cells. Usually, the melatonin concentration in these cells is much higher than that found in the blood, but it does not seem to be regulated by the photoperiod.

Research has shown that when bird chicks ingest melatonin-rich plant feed, such as rice, the melatonin binds to melatonin receptors in their brains. No food has been found to elevate plasma melatonin levels in humans.

Products containing melatonin have been available over-the-counter as dietary supplements in the United States since the mid-1990s. In many other countries, the over-the-counter sale of this neurohormone is not permitted or requires a prescription, and the U.S. Postal Service lists unapproved melatonin preparations among items prohibited by Germany.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA