Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Senior's weakness for scams may be warning sign of dementia

Does an older friend or relative have a hard time hanging up on telemarketers? Or get excited about a "You've won a prize" voicemail? New research suggests seniors who aren't on guard against scams also might be at risk for ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Alzheimer's diagnosis, management improved by brain scans

A first-of-its-kind national study has found that a form of brain imaging that detects Alzheimer's-related "plaques" significantly influenced clinical management of patients with mild cognitive impairment and dementia.

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Home-based tools can help assess dementia risk and progression

Clinical trials to develop new therapeutic and preventive treatments for Alzheimer's disease (AD) are costly, complicated and often preclude persons most at risk of developing the degenerative neurological condition: Older ...

Health

Can eating certain foods make you smarter?

Trying to keep up with what constitutes a "healthy" diet can be exhausting. With unending options at the supermarket, and diet advice coming from all directions, filling your shopping trolley with the right things can seem ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Eating mushrooms may reduce the risk of cognitive decline

A team from the Department of Psychological Medicine and Department of Biochemistry at the Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine at the National University of Singapore (NUS) has found that seniors who consume more than two standard ...

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Mild cognitive impairment

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI, also known as incipient dementia, or isolated memory impairment) is a diagnosis given to individuals who have cognitive impairments beyond that expected for their age and education, but that do not interfere significantly with their daily activities. It is considered to be the boundary or transitional stage between normal aging and dementia. Although MCI can present with a variety of symptoms, when memory loss is the predominant symptom it is termed "amnestic MCI" and is frequently seen as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.

Studies suggest that these individuals tend to progress to probable Alzheimer’s disease at a rate of approximately 10% to 15% per year. Additionally, when individuals have impairments in domains other than memory it is classified as non-amnestic single- or multiple-domain MCI and these individuals are believed to be more likely to convert to other dementias (i.e. dementia with Lewy bodies).

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