Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Visual impairment may up risk for dementia in older women

(HealthDay)—In older women, objectively measured visual impairment is associated with a twofold to more than fivefold increased risk for dementia, according to a study published online April 16 in JAMA Ophthalmology.

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Study: An aspirin a day does not keep dementia at bay

Taking a low-dose aspirin once a day does not reduce the risk of thinking and memory problems caused by mild cognitive impairment or probable Alzheimer's disease, nor does it slow the rate of cognitive decline, according ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Dementia test to expand diagnosis across India

A standardised test that can now be used in the seven main languages in India will support the diagnosis of dementia and mild cognitive impairment.

Neuroscience

Bilingualism acts as a cognitive reserve factor against dementia

The conclusions of a study carried out by Víctor Costumero, as the first author, Marco Calabria and Albert Costa (died in 2018), members of the Speech Production and Bilingualism (SPB) group at the Cognition and Brain Center ...

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Mild cognitive impairment

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI, also known as incipient dementia, or isolated memory impairment) is a diagnosis given to individuals who have cognitive impairments beyond that expected for their age and education, but that do not interfere significantly with their daily activities. It is considered to be the boundary or transitional stage between normal aging and dementia. Although MCI can present with a variety of symptoms, when memory loss is the predominant symptom it is termed "amnestic MCI" and is frequently seen as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.

Studies suggest that these individuals tend to progress to probable Alzheimer’s disease at a rate of approximately 10% to 15% per year. Additionally, when individuals have impairments in domains other than memory it is classified as non-amnestic single- or multiple-domain MCI and these individuals are believed to be more likely to convert to other dementias (i.e. dementia with Lewy bodies).

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