Neuroscience

Are bigger brains better?

When it comes to certain parts of the brain, bigger doesn't necessarily equate to better memory. According to a new study led by Michigan State University, a larger hippocampus, a curved, seahorse-shaped structure embedded ...

Medications

Brain biomarkers for detecting Alzheimer's disease located

From the detection of functional brain changes that occur during Alzheimer's disease (AD), a research team from the Complutense University of Madrid (UCM) has located a set of biomarkers that could predict which patients ...

Alzheimer's disease & dementia

Smartphone app to screen for early signs of dementia

Testing for dementia among elderly could one day be as simple as talking into a smartphone thanks to speech-analyzing technology being developed by engineers at UNSW Sydney.

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Mild cognitive impairment

Mild cognitive impairment (MCI, also known as incipient dementia, or isolated memory impairment) is a diagnosis given to individuals who have cognitive impairments beyond that expected for their age and education, but that do not interfere significantly with their daily activities. It is considered to be the boundary or transitional stage between normal aging and dementia. Although MCI can present with a variety of symptoms, when memory loss is the predominant symptom it is termed "amnestic MCI" and is frequently seen as a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.

Studies suggest that these individuals tend to progress to probable Alzheimer’s disease at a rate of approximately 10% to 15% per year. Additionally, when individuals have impairments in domains other than memory it is classified as non-amnestic single- or multiple-domain MCI and these individuals are believed to be more likely to convert to other dementias (i.e. dementia with Lewy bodies).

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