Diseases, Conditions, Syndromes

Chronic pain, a silent yet devastating disease in the workplace

In France, one person out of three suffers from chronic pain, including back, neck or neuropathic pain, sciatica and restless legs syndrome. According to academic research, 15 to 20% of the adult population suffers from mild ...

Health

Training the brain to quit smoking

In many ways, the decline of smoking is one of America's great public health success stories. Before the Surgeon General released a damning report on smoking and health in 1964, more than 40 percent of American adults smoked. ...

Health

Eating mindfully through the holidays—and all year

Slow down before plowing through the holiday hors d'oeuvres or finishing off that overfilled plate of comfort food. An approach called mindful eating could just help you enjoy it even more and increase well-being.

Psychology & Psychiatry

How meditation can help you make fewer mistakes

If you are forgetful or make mistakes when in a hurry, a new study from Michigan State University—the largest of its kind to-date—found that meditation could help you to become less error prone.

Psychology & Psychiatry

Mindfulness meditation training alters how we process fearful memories

Participating in an eight-week mindfulness meditation program appears to alter how the brain processes fear memories. In a study that will appear in the November 1st print issue of Biological Psychiatry, a team led by Massachusetts ...

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Mindfulness

Mindfulness (Pali: sati, Sanskrit: smṛti / स्मृति) in Buddhist meditation.; also translated as awareness) is a spiritual faculty (indriya) that is considered to be of great importance in the path to enlightenment according to the teaching of the Buddha. It is one of the seven factors of enlightenment. "Correct" or "right" mindfulness (Pali: sammā-sati, Sanskrit samyak-smṛti) is the seventh element of the noble eightfold path.

Enlightenment (bodhi) is a state of being in which greed, hatred and delusion (Pali: moha) have been overcome, abandoned and are absent from the mind. Mindfulness, which, among other things, is an attentive awareness of the reality of things (especially of the present moment) is an antidote to delusion and is considered as such a 'power' (Pali: bala). This faculty becomes a power in particular when it is coupled with clear comprehension of whatever is taking place.

The Buddha advocated that one should establish mindfulness (satipatthana) in one's day-to-day life maintaining as much as possible a calm awareness of one's bodily functions, sensations (feelings), objects of consciousness (thoughts and perceptions), and consciousness itself. The practice of mindfulness supports analysis resulting in the arising of wisdom (Pali: paññā, Sanskrit: prajñā). A key innovative teaching of the Buddha was that meditative stabilisation must be combined with liberating discernment.

The Satipatthana Sutta (Sanskrit: Smṛtyupasthāna Sūtra) is an early text dealing with mindfulness.

Mindfulness practice, inherited from the Buddhist tradition, is increasingly being employed in Western psychology to alleviate a variety of mental and physical conditions, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, anxiety, and in the prevention of relapse in depression and drug addiction. See also Mindfulness (psychology).

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