Medications

Opioid changes may lead to more overdoses in NZ

A change in the supply of pharmaceutical morphine could inadvertently lead to more overdoses by people who inject opioids such as morphine and heroin, a University of Auckland expert warns.

Medications

Rwanda avoids US-style opioids crisis by making own morphine

It was something, the silence. Nothing but the puff of her breath and the scuff of her slip-on shoes as Madeleine Mukantagara walked through the fields to her first patient of the day. Piercing cries once echoed down the ...

Medications

Personalized pain management

There is an urgent need to identify reliable predictors of opioid responses to develop personalized opioid therapy for chronic pain management. A goal is to target opioid therapy to patients most likely to benefit from treatment ...

Neuroscience

Change in brain cells linked to opiate addiction, narcolepsy

Two discoveries—one in the brains of people with heroin addiction and the other in the brains of sleepy mice—shed light on chemical messengers in the brain that regulate sleep and addiction, UCLA researchers say.

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Morphine

Morphine (INN) (pronounced /ˈmɔrfiːn/) (MS Contin, MSIR, Avinza, Kadian, Oramorph, Roxanol) is a highly potent opiate analgesic psychoactive drug, is the principal active ingredient in Papaver somniferum (opium poppy, or simply opium), is considered to be the prototypical opioid. Like other opioids, e.g. oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet, Percodan), hydromorphone (Dilaudid, Palladone), and diacetylmorphine (Heroin), morphine acts directly on the central nervous system (CNS) to relieve pain. Morphine has a high potential for addiction; tolerance and both physical and psychological dependence develop rapidly.

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