Neuroscience

Optical stimulation causes marmosets to move their forelimbs

RIKEN neuroscientists have succeeded in getting marmosets to move their forelimbs when they shine laser light on the motor cortex—the brain region responsible for planning, conducting and controlling voluntary movements. ...

Medical research

Researchers regrow damaged nerves with polymer and protein

University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine researchers have created a biodegradable nerve guide—a polymer tube—filled with growth-promoting protein that can regenerate long sections of damaged nerves, without the need ...

Neuroscience

New roles found for Huntington's disease protein

A Duke University research team has identified a new function of a gene called huntingtin, a mutation of which underlies the progressive neurodegenerative disorder known as Huntington's Disease.

Genetics

Scientists discover link between ALS genes

The enzyme Gemin3 was identified as the molecular 'bridge' between genes whose mutation or disruption causes amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), according to a new study in Nature's Scientific Reports from scientists at ...

Health

Plasticizers may contribute to motor control problems in girls

Scientists at the Columbia Center for Children's Environmental Health (CCCEH) have uncovered a link between prenatal exposure to phthalates—a ubiquitous group of plasticizers and odor-enhancing chemicals—and deficits ...

Neuroscience

Some learning is a whole-brain affair, study shows

Researchers at Johns Hopkins Medicine have successfully used a laser-assisted imaging tool to "see" what happens in brain cells of mice learning to reach out and grab a pellet of food. Their experiments, they say, add to ...

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Motorcycle

A motorcycle (also called a motorbike, bike, or cycle) is a single-track, two-wheeled motor vehicle. Motorcycles vary considerably depending on the task for which they are designed, such as long distance travel, navigating congested urban traffic, cruising, sport and racing, or off-road conditions.

Motorcycles are one of the most affordable forms of motorised transport in many parts of the world and, for most of the world's population, they are also the most common type of motor vehicle. There are around 200 million motorcycles (including mopeds, motor scooters, motorised bicycles, and other powered two and three-wheelers) in use worldwide, or about 33 motorcycles per 1000 people. This compares to around 590 million cars, or about 91 per 1000 people. Most of the motorcycles, 58%, are in the developing countries of Asia — Southern and Eastern Asia, and the Asia Pacific countries, excluding Japan — while 33% of the cars (195 million) are concentrated in the United States and Japan. In 2006 China had 54 million motorcycles in use and an annual production of 22 million units. As of 2002[update], India with an estimated 37 million motorcycles/mopeds was home to the largest number of motorised two wheelers in the world. China came a close second with 34 million motorcycles/mopeds.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA