Sports medicine & Kinesiology

Lifelong female exercisers benefit from better muscle function

Exercising throughout a woman's life may help preserve muscle power during the aging process, according to recent research. The study, the first to examine the effects of lifelong aerobic exercise on a woman's muscles as ...

Health

Tips for maintaining muscle as you age

Starting around age 35, we begin to lose muscle mass. Although regular exercisers lose muscle as they age, inactive people can lose as much as 5 percent of their muscle every decade.

Gerontology & Geriatrics

Elderly people should aim to keep up step count this winter

As the temperature continues to drop this winter, it is harder to find the motivation to get off the couch and out for a walk. New research from the University of Liverpool, presented at The Physiological Society's early ...

Sports medicine & Kinesiology

Quad training for knee support

Whether you're mountain biking, kicking a soccer ball with friends, or just sprinting down the street to catch a bus, your quadriceps are hard at work.

Health

Vitamin D deficiency and poor muscle function in the over-60s

New research from Trinity College Dublin shows that vitamin D deficiency is an important determinant of poor skeletal muscle function in adults aged 60 years and over. Maintaining skeletal muscle function throughout life ...

Sports medicine & Kinesiology

Rise in testosterone level boosts young women's running capacity

A rise in the level of the male hormone testosterone significantly boosts young physically active women's capacity to run for longer, reveals the first study of its kind, published online in the British Journal of Sports ...

Health

The surprising benefits of weight training

(HealthDay)—The most common misconception about weight training is that it adds bulky muscle mass, a fear of some women. While elite male lifters can—and want to—get very developed, for most people the result is simply ...

page 1 from 21

Muscle

Muscle (from Latin musculus, diminutive of mus "mouse") is the contractile tissue of the body and is derived from the mesodermal layer of embryonic germ cells. Muscle cells contain contractile filaments that move past each other and change the size of the cell. They are classified as skeletal, cardiac, or smooth muscles. Their function is to produce force and cause motion. Muscles can cause either locomotion of the organism itself or movement of internal organs. Cardiac and smooth muscle contraction occurs without conscious thought and is necessary for survival. Examples are the contraction of the heart and peristalsis which pushes food through the digestive system. Voluntary contraction of the skeletal muscles is used to move the body and can be finely controlled. Examples are movements of the eye, or gross movements like the quadriceps muscle of the thigh. There are two broad types of voluntary muscle fibers: slow twitch and fast twitch. Slow twitch fibers contract for long periods of time but with little force while fast twitch fibers contract quickly and powerfully but fatigue very rapidly.

This text uses material from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA