Medical research

Substituting the next-best protein

When an actor is unable to perform in the theatre, an understudy—ideally one with some practice in the role—can take her place on stage. A study from Dr. Bernard Jasmin's laboratory at the University of Ottawa and published ...

Health

Why weight training may be the best exercise for everyone

While research shows little or no link between exercise and any meaningful long-term weight loss, that doesn't mean exercising, particularly resistance training, doesn't provide a long list of health benefits, both physical ...

Genetics

New gene correction therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

Duchenne type muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common hereditary muscular disease among children, leaving them wheelchair-bound before the age of 12 and reducing life expectancy. Researchers at Technical University of ...

Sports medicine & Kinesiology

Lifelong female exercisers benefit from better muscle function

Exercising throughout a woman's life may help preserve muscle power during the aging process, according to recent research. The study, the first to examine the effects of lifelong aerobic exercise on a woman's muscles as ...

Health

Tips for maintaining muscle as you age

Starting around age 35, we begin to lose muscle mass. Although regular exercisers lose muscle as they age, inactive people can lose as much as 5 percent of their muscle every decade.

Gerontology & Geriatrics

Elderly people should aim to keep up step count this winter

As the temperature continues to drop this winter, it is harder to find the motivation to get off the couch and out for a walk. New research from the University of Liverpool, presented at The Physiological Society's early ...

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Muscle

Muscle (from Latin musculus, diminutive of mus "mouse") is the contractile tissue of the body and is derived from the mesodermal layer of embryonic germ cells. Muscle cells contain contractile filaments that move past each other and change the size of the cell. They are classified as skeletal, cardiac, or smooth muscles. Their function is to produce force and cause motion. Muscles can cause either locomotion of the organism itself or movement of internal organs. Cardiac and smooth muscle contraction occurs without conscious thought and is necessary for survival. Examples are the contraction of the heart and peristalsis which pushes food through the digestive system. Voluntary contraction of the skeletal muscles is used to move the body and can be finely controlled. Examples are movements of the eye, or gross movements like the quadriceps muscle of the thigh. There are two broad types of voluntary muscle fibers: slow twitch and fast twitch. Slow twitch fibers contract for long periods of time but with little force while fast twitch fibers contract quickly and powerfully but fatigue very rapidly.

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