Health

Getting a grip on better health

Men with muscles like a young Arnold Schwarzenegger or a top weightlifter look powerful but a handshake will give away whether they're a healthy specimen—or at risk of a chronic disease or premature aging, experts say.

Health

Sitting for turkey? WHO reminds all to get more active

As the coronavirus leaves many people housebound and many Americans sit to feast for Thanksgiving, the World Health Organization says people need to get more active, insisting that up to 5 million deaths worldwide could be ...

Gerontology & Geriatrics

Walking downhill increases risk of falls in older adults

Falls are a common cause of injury in older adults and can lead to disability. Luckily, the risk of falls can be reduced with regular exercise– but not all exercise. Our latest study shows that so-called eccentric exercise—such ...

Sports medicine & Kinesiology

Exercising one arm has twice the benefits

New research from Edith Cowan University (ECU) has revealed that training one arm can improve strength and decrease muscle loss in the other arm—without even moving it.

Health

How strong your grip is says a lot about your health

The human hand is remarkable. Not only does it allow us to throw, grab, climb and pick things up, it can also be a measure of health. Using hand-grip strength—which assesses the amount of force a person can generate with ...

Oncology & Cancer

Regenerating muscles after cancer surgery

Advancements in microsurgery are making it possible to harness the body's healing power to regenerate muscle strength after some cancer surgeries, particularly surgery to remove soft tissue sarcoma. Mayo Clinic orthopedic ...

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Muscle

Muscle (from Latin musculus, diminutive of mus "mouse") is the contractile tissue of the body and is derived from the mesodermal layer of embryonic germ cells. Muscle cells contain contractile filaments that move past each other and change the size of the cell. They are classified as skeletal, cardiac, or smooth muscles. Their function is to produce force and cause motion. Muscles can cause either locomotion of the organism itself or movement of internal organs. Cardiac and smooth muscle contraction occurs without conscious thought and is necessary for survival. Examples are the contraction of the heart and peristalsis which pushes food through the digestive system. Voluntary contraction of the skeletal muscles is used to move the body and can be finely controlled. Examples are movements of the eye, or gross movements like the quadriceps muscle of the thigh. There are two broad types of voluntary muscle fibers: slow twitch and fast twitch. Slow twitch fibers contract for long periods of time but with little force while fast twitch fibers contract quickly and powerfully but fatigue very rapidly.

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